I want to make a film on music: Irrfan | entertainment | Hindustan Times
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I want to make a film on music: Irrfan

After over two decades, Irrfan Khan is ready to move to the other side of the camera. But till he can line up the perfect script and technical team, Khan is focussed on acting. Rachana Dubey tells more.

entertainment Updated: Jun 20, 2009 18:04 IST
Rachana Dubey

After over two decades, Irrfan Khan is ready to move to the other side of the camera. “I don’t have the temperament for a producer but I do want to be involved with film production. I want to make a movie on music. I love listening to Jim Morrison’s songs and have an ear for classical and folk music as well,” he informs.

But till he can line up the perfect script and technical team, Khan is focussed on acting. His next release will be Kabir Khan’s New York, also featuring John Abraham, Neil Nitin Mukesh and Katrina Kaif. Set in post 9/11, the movie talks about the repercussions of U S policies on the rest of the world.

“Every Asian is looked upon with suspicion today,” he points out, adding that he plays a Muslim FBI officer in the film who attempts to offer a balanced perspective to the madness around. He met several such officers while filming A Mighty Heart.
Shameful!

The actor fumes when reminded about the racist attacks Down Under. “It’s shameful what’s happening to Indian students in Australia. Such incidents have increased since the 9/11,” he points out. Khan points to Britain’s minister, Griffin’s recent remark that all immigrants should move out and U K should be for whites only. “I won’t be surprised if such incidents escalate and harm nationals from other countries too,” he states.

The actor who has five-seven releases lined up over the next six months, believes that the recent producer-multiplex strike should have been over piracy and not profit sharing. “Piracy is eating into our earnings, a producer doesn’t make enough on his investments,” he sighs.

Unfair but true
The conversation moves to Shiney Ahuja who’s been accused of rape. “He’s not guilty till the charges against him are proved. But if he is guilty, I wonder what his daughter would think of him when she grows up?” says Khan, a concerned parent.

Rape, he points out, can happen even in a marriage. “Imagine what a woman goes through, night after night, to protect the sanctity of the social bond?” he asks. “That kind of rape is equally heinous. Why should a woman be forced into having physical relations with her husband if she doesn’t want it? When we see a big name being accused of a crime we could be committing every day, we want to punish him to rid ourselves of our guilt. Unfair but true!”