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Krazzy4 set for release with all songs

Bollywood movie Krazzy4 is set for release on Friday with all song sequences after an advertisement-jingle composer and producer Rakesh Roshan reached a "settlement" on Thursday.

entertainment Updated: Apr 10, 2008 21:27 IST

Bollywood movie Krazzy4 is set for release on Friday with all song sequences after an advertisement-jingle composer and producer Rakesh Roshan reached a "settlement" on Thursday in a day-long drama shortly after the Mumbai High Court ordered deletion of two songs on plagiarism charges.

After a victory in the Bombay High Court, composer Ram Sampath reached a settlement with producer Rakesh Roshan and gave his consent for the movie's release with all the songs, which were embroiled in the legal case.

Earlier in the day, High Court had upheld Sampath's case prima facie, restraining Roshan from releasing the movie with the songs. Sampath had claimed that his tunes had been copied for two songs -- `Krazzy4' (title song) and `Break-free'--and their remixed versions.

But in the afternoon, Sampath reached a settlement with Roshan, and both the parties approached Justice D G Karnik for revocation of his earlier order.

"I won the case, and then we settled the matter "inside the court", Sampath told PTI.

"We went back to the Judge, and got the (earlier) order vacated," he added.

However, he declined to divulge the terms of the settlement. "Once we end the case formally, the settlement will be in the public domain," the composer said.

Sampath's case was that his tunes for the advertisement for Sony Eriksson cell-phones was copied by music composer and Rakesh's brother Rajesh Roshan.

He moved High Court last week seeking damages of Rs 2 crore, and interim stay to the film's release. The court, in its interim order in the morning, accepted Sampath's case that his tunes have been plagiarised.

"To my untrained ear, the music (in two works) appeared to be similar", Justice Karnik had said.