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Mumbai’s spot fixing

They didn’t manage to score tickets to the finals, but these creative Mumbaikars found some weird places to watch the match instead.

entertainment Updated: Apr 02, 2011 12:56 IST

The last remaining tickets for the India v/s Sri Lanka World Cup finals today are being sold for the price of a small car. This has left crafty Mumbaikars in need of some creative options for match viewing.

Sunil Tiwari, film assistant director, caught the India-Pakistan thriller at Shehnai marriage hall in Thane, which is where he’s headed again. “A friend of mine with political connections decided to organise a viewing for his friends and family, so he booked this marriage hall. They had put up a big screen and there were beers and refreshments for everybody,” he reveals. The strange location didn’t deter about 100 people from turning up. “Nobody had to pay for entry and they told people verbally. It was a great environment, so I’m going there again today.”

Watching sports games at mall food courts has been popular for a while, but Inorbit Mall in Malad upped their antics by creating bleacher-style seating in the car park, and hiring cheerleaders to boot. “For the Wednesday match, the stadium set-up was done in association with a car brand, who took up a portion of the parking area,” says Nishank Joshi, assistant general manager corporate communications, Inorbit. “The seating was enough to accommodate about 50 people, but many were standing around watching the match. The response was very good, so we shall have the same set-up for the finals today,” he adds.

Even housing societies are organising screenings in their compounds. Jashoda Housing Society in Matunga, has a huge screen set-up for the semi-finals, alerting residents about match highlights on loudspeakers. Offices like Directi in Andheri, though closed on Satudays, are opening doors to employees after conducting an internal poll on whether they’d travel to work despite the holiday.