Music Review: Ishqiya | entertainment | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jan 18, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Music Review: Ishqiya

entertainment Updated: Jan 09, 2010 18:18 IST
Highlight Story

IshqiyaIshqiya

Music Director: Vishal Bhardwaj

Lyricist: Gulzar

Singers: Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Sukhwinder Singh, Mika Singh, Rekha Bhardwaj and Clinton Cerejo

Rating: *** 1/2

Vishal Bhardwaj's track record as a composer has been very impressive and with Ishqiya he once again proves that he is not only a good filmmaker but also a brilliant musician.

It is an album to watch out for - most of the songs are hummable and could go on to become chartbusters.

Ishqiya, which stars Naseeruddin Shah, Arshad Warsi and Vidya Balan, has four originals and three remixes.

The album begins with the great composition titled Dil to bachcha hai. Sung by the brilliant Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, the song instantly strikes a chord with the listener thanks to its retro feel and soothing orchestration.

It seems to be inspired by the music of a Raj Kapoor film and the accordion is being used in a track after a long time. It is hummable and one of the best songs of the album.

The remix of the song is equally appealing. In this version, the music is louder and more contemporary. However, there are no unnecessary beats or jarring sounds. Singer Clinton Cerejo pitches in with a few English lyrics.

Next in line is Ibn-e-batuta, the most ordinary of the lot. While it isn't brilliant, it's a peppy track sung by Sukhwinder Singh and Mika Singh. It doesn't appeal as much as the other songs.

The number has two remixes - one is a general remix version and the other is called the nucleya remix version. Both are average.

Then there is Ab mujhe koi in the soulful voice of Rekha Bhardwaj. There is something magical about Rekha's voice that lifts the song completely. The slow-paced track, coupled with the strumming of the guitar, the sound of the piano and drums, has a mesmerising effect on the listener.

Finally, the album offers another Rekha rendition, Badi Dheere jali. Starting with the music of the sitar, this semi-classical number, mixed with western music is a treat to the ears. The song slowly grows on you and presents a combination that is highly interesting. Rekha's vocals coupled with Bhardwaj's tunes create magic.

The album boasts of Bhardwaj's signature style as he has stayed away from the typical formula numbers. The soundtrack is a must hear. It is indeed a commendable job by the composer, who believes in experimentation and brings out something fresh always.

<