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Net bonding

A recent research says that nearly two thirds of American teenagers share such a comfortable rapport with their parents that they have added them up on Facebook.

entertainment Updated: Jan 23, 2011 00:56 IST
Shara Ashraf

A recent research says that nearly two thirds of American teenagers share such a comfortable rapport with their parents that they have added them up on Facebook. The study concluded that almost 65 percent of teens are all for including their mom and dad in their friend list and this is quite a healthy trend.

Closer home too, a growing number of teenagers are happy about having added their parents on their friend list. “My dad knows about everything that’s going on in my life and that includes my latest crush in school. So why would I think twice before adding him in my friend list? As my father spends a great deal of time travelling, Facebook is a great channel that keeps us connected,” says 18-year-old Abhimanyu Rathore.

Many even feel that the social networking site has strengthened their bonds with their parents. “It was my addiction to Facebook that made my mom join the site. I soon discovered that there’s a lot more in common between us,” says 19-year-old Samaira Agnihotri. “My mom finds it cool to be on the site and has become less critical about my dressing style. May be because she chats with my friends and has realised that youngsters do need some freedom in their lives,” she adds.

But everyone may not find the idea of adding up parents on Facebook exciting. “I won’t have mom pore over my friend list and get worried about this one guy in my friend list who has got uncountable tattoos on his body and uses cuss words. He is not a close friend but can make mom unnecessarily panicky,” says 17-year-old Aditi Mishra.

Psychiatrist Samir Parikh explains why so. He believes that Indians are not culturally tuned to share everything with parents. “We are taking Facebook too seriously. I don’t think it improves child-parent relationship in any way. Unlike the west, a teenager in India, may not be comfortable sharing everything about their lives, with parents. But this doesn’t mean there is no emotional attachment between them,” says Parikh.