New phone etiquette: Don't call anyone | entertainment | Hindustan Times
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New phone etiquette: Don't call anyone

Gone are the days when people would be delighted to receive phone calls from friends just wanting to know if they were doing alright. Now nobody expects any calls from anyone and would prefer receiving a text.

entertainment Updated: Mar 22, 2011 14:54 IST

Gone are the days when people would be delighted to receive phone calls from friends just wanting to know if they were doing alright. Now nobody expects any calls from anyone and would prefer receiving a text.

"I literally never use the phone. Sometimes I call my mother on the way to work because she'll be happy to chitty chat. But I just can't think of anyone else who'd want to talk to me," Jonathan Adler, an interior designer, tells New York Times.

He doesn't want to be called, either, "I've learned not to press 'ignore' on my cell phone because then people know that you're there."

He adds, "I remember when I was growing up, the rule was, don't call anyone after 10 p.m. Now the rule is, don't call anyone. Ever."

On phonePeople think that a phone call may disrupt an urgent work. "I've been hammering away at this for decades. The telephone has a very rude propensity to interrupt people and the callers expect that we should drop whatever we're doing and listen to them," states Judith Martin, aka Miss Manners, to the daily.

Work places have also become call free. The reason being that nobody has assistants anymore to handle telecommunications and people don't want to disrupt co-workers in nearly door-free workplaces. "When I walk around the office, nobody is on the phone," Jonathan Burnham, senior vice president and publisher at HarperCollins, informs the daily.

The nature of phone calls has also changed over the period of time. "Phone calls used to be everything: serious, light, heavy, funny. But now they tend to be things that are very focused. And almost everyone e-mails first and asks, 'Is it O.K. if I call?'" added Jonathan.

Matthew Ballast, an executive director for publicity at Grand Central Publishing, also feels similarly. "I remember five years ago, I had a pad with a list of calls I had to return. You pretty much call people on the phone when you don't understand their e-mail," he said.

No calling trend has begun!