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Oh God!

entertainment Updated: Feb 18, 2010 18:22 IST
Rahul Sabharwal
Rahul Sabharwal
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

They are rich, they are famous...and they are blasphemous.

At least that’s what a host of top international celebrities have been accused of, thanks to some eye-catching gimmicks they have pulled.

Last week, singer Lindsay Lohan earned the wrath of many a Catholic, courtesy her ‘crucifixion’ pose. Lilo appeared on the cover of French fashion magazine Purple with arms splayed, in a crown of thorns and low-cut white robe. Soon enough, Catholic League chief Bill Donohue called the pose ‘inappropriate’.

Of course, Lilo’s antic hardly matches up to that of pop Goddess Madonna, who angered religious leaders in August 2006 when she held a mock crucifixion at her concert in Rome, two miles from the Vatican. The scene of Madonna on a mirrored cross and wearing a crown of thorns drew fire from religious leaders, who condemned it as an act of hostility toward the Roman Catholic Church.

In January 2006, rapper Kanye West, who is no stranger to controversy, posed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine as Jesus, complete with a crown of thorns. While the cover left many wondering whether he had gone too far, Kanye’s response was, “You want me to be great, but you don’t ever want me to say I’m great?”

Model Joanna Krupa’s got more than just tongues wagging when she posed in the buff for a PETA campaign in December 2009, floating like an angel over a group of dogs, holding
nothing but a giant crucifix to cover the bare minimum.

Her message, ‘Be an angel for animals’, was lost, however, when Deal Hudson, publisher of InsideCatholic.com, called it an ‘instance of disrespect toward Christianity’. Krupa maintained she was ‘proud’ of the campaign.

In 2008, model Heidi Klum dressed as Goddess Kali to a Halloween party, leaving Hindu groups in America fuming. “Goddess Kali is not to be used in clubs for publicity stunts or thrown around loosely for dramatic effects,” said Indo-American statesman Rajan Zed.