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One film, many languages

An increasing number of Bollywood filmmakers are now wielding the microphone for multilinguals, which target a wider audience. The result — two films almost at the cost of one.

entertainment Updated: May 24, 2010 00:43 IST

An increasing number of Bollywood filmmakers are now wielding the microphone for multilinguals, which target a wider audience. For movies such as Raavan, Rakta Charitra and The Business Man, for example, the filmmakers are using the same locations, resources, and mostly the same cast, and shooting them simultaneously in different languages. The result — two films almost at the cost of one.

“(Film)makers are getting into making multilingual films so that the loss is minimised by targeting the film at a wider audience and the reach of the film increases,” says trade analyst Komal Nahta. “This is a profitable trend and will stay on for at least some time.”

Ram Gopal Varma has shot his upcoming trilingual two-part thriller Rakta Charitra in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu. “Because of the subject matter of the film, it was made a trilingual and also because of Tamil star Surya’s presence in the film,” says Varma.

He has also decided to go trilingual in The Business Man, which gives crime a facelift. He will repeat Surya in the new gangster movie that will be made in Tamil, Telugu and Hindi.

The National Film Development Corporation of India (NFDC) is working on the country’s first Hindi-Assamese movie. The Hindi version is titled As The River Flows while the Assamese one is called Ekhon Nedhekha Nadir Shipaare.

“This (trend) works in two ways — one is that the market gets expanded and, secondly, artistically speaking, you can transcend barriers,” says film critic Utpal Borpujari.

DAR Motion Pictures recently produced Mahesh Manjrekar-directed City of Gold in Hindi and Lalbaug Parel in Marathi.