Resul Pookutty wants to make a film with AB | entertainment | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 05, 2016-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Resul Pookutty wants to make a film with AB

entertainment Updated: May 14, 2010 17:05 IST
Jayeeta Mazumder
Jayeeta Mazumder
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Resul Pookutty is another Quentin Tarantino fan. He loved Inglourious Basterds. Robert Bresson and Akira Kurosawa are his other favourites. Also, Sanjay Leela Bhansali and Rajat Kapoor. And some day, he’d like to enter this elite club too. “If you asked me to direct a film tomorrow, I’d do it,” he admits.

In fact, the Oscar-winning sound engineer has a ready script. But doesn’t think it is wise to switch lanes right away. “I’m doing really well as a sound engineer, so I think I should capitalise on this aspect of film-making for now,” he points out, but adds that someday he’d like to make a film with Amitabh Bachchan. “It’s my ultimate dream and I’m trying to incorporate Mr Bachchan into my script in some way.”

Write ways
Pookutty released his autobiography in Malayalam titled Shabdatharapadham (The Sound of Milky Way) yesterday, in the presence of AR Rahman and Gulzar. The English version will be out on the shelves in three months.

“When Penguin first approached me to write my story, I laughed off the suggestion. But after a month of persuasion, I thought it was a good way of talking about cinema that’s a passion,” he says.

The 400-page autobiography has been written in the form of a travelogue with co-writer Baiju Natarajan, “who knows so much about me that I call him (my) clone”.

Natarajan recorded their conversations before putting them down on paper and Pookutty says that for someone who handles sound that’s the most appropriate way to write the book.

Inside stories
The journey starts with his days at FTII to the Oscar winning Slumdog Millionaire. “There are inside stories from the BAFTA Awards when I drove around the streets of Soho in a limo, wearing a tuxedo. It’s about living on 10 pounds to winning an Oscar. It’s a story of an ordinary man thrown into extraordinary situations,” he smiles.

How much has life changed after the Oscar? “Well, I’m still the same man. But nobody is giving me work. You must write that I’m looking for work!” he laughs.

Pookutty predicts the golden era of cinema over the next decade. “Subhash Ghai’s initial films were known for their superior writing. And there’s a surge of great stories from young directors now.”

He has plans for an album too, that will be a compilation of his film compositions. As a student, he wanted to write lyrics and says that he “has music in him”.

Working with Rahman, he says, leaves him exhausted: “You just want to go home and crash because he always works at night,” he says. “Still, he is like a big brother whom I’ve learnt a lot from.”