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Ride Yash Chopra train in Switzerland

Ever thought of reliving the time Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol spent together while shooting the song Zara sa jhoom loon… in a Swiss train. Famous Swiss landscapes, seen in filmmaker’s movies, now home to hotel suite, train named after the veteran.

entertainment Updated: Apr 12, 2011 16:58 IST
Prashant Singh

Ever thought of reliving the time Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol spent together while shooting the song Zara sa jhoom loon… in a Swiss train from the film, Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (DDLJ).

Now, Bollywood fans can actually go that distance and not return disappointed. Jungfrau Railways in Switzerland recently inaugurated a train named after the Bollywood veteran Yash Chopra. Complete with his signature and name on a signboard, the train was launched by the filmmaker in the presence of Jungfrau Railways CEO Urs Kessler in Switzerland on Friday.

Popular songs such as Tu mere saamne… from Darr with Shah Rukh Khan and Juhi Chawla and Zara sa jhoom loon… from DDLJ were shot on Jungfrau Railways’ trains. Not many know that Chopra’s first visited Switzerland in 1984 to shoot his film, Faasle. However, the last Yash Raj Films production to be shot in Switzerland was Bachna Ae Haseeno (2008), directed by Siddharth Anand.

Not just that, a deluxe suite of the Victoria-Jungfrau Grand Hotel too has been named after Chopra. Parts of the song, Naa jaane mere dil ko…, which were passed off as being shot in London in DDLJ, were actually located near this hotel. “It’s a historical and emotional moment. These felicitations aren’t just for me, but for my industry and, my country, India,” says Chopra, who was also honoured with the Ambassador of Interlaken award, making him its first recipient.

Chopra, who is often credited for showcasing Switzerland in his films, feels his romance with the country is still going strong. “Generally people try to fleece filmmakers when they go to shoot a film abroad. But here, authorities are genuinely interested in helping you,” he says, before recalling an incident where a traffic policeman actually diverted traffic to accommodate the shoot. “I was nervous because I had to wrap up the shot that day itself. I was quite surprised that the traffic policeman agreed to divert the traffic.”