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Udaan director nervous

Not only has Roger Ebert reviewed his first film, but it has also made it to a prestigious category at the Cannes Film Festival. It even happens to be produced by Anurag Kashyap. Yet, Vikramaditya Motwane is “very nervous” about the release of Udaan.

entertainment Updated: Jun 25, 2010 14:39 IST
Serena Menon

Not only has Roger Ebert reviewed his first film, but it has also made it to a prestigious category at the Cannes Film Festival. It even happens to be produced by Anurag Kashyap. Yet, Vikramaditya Motwane is “very nervous” about the release of

Udaan

on July 16.



Motwane’s debut, which has been in the news for numerous reasons including a no-show from Bollywood stars at its screening at the Cannes Film Festival, was almost never made.



“I thought of the film and then thought to myself, ‘Boss… how will this film get made in India?” Motwane says adding: “I saw this film called

Sweet Sixteen

(2002) by Ken Loach the last time I was at Cannes. It taught me that I could make a film like that and make it accessible to everyone too.”



But that still didn’t hurry things up for the 30-something director who began writing this film in 2003. Seven years and many rejections later, he still had the patience to remain quiet when not many people from the Hindi film industry supported his film at Cannes.



“I think there is a lack of solidarity in the industry. Instead of supporting each other (pauses)… I’m not going to point fingers, but I would have liked it to be an open invitation to all. I’ll let my work talk for me.”



When asked whether it was tough working with producer Anurag Kashyap, who has a strong creative sense and directorial style of his own, he says, “I met Anurag when he was writing the dialogue for Deepa Mehta’s

Water

. We became friends and then I showed him the script. I remember he saw it and said jokingly, ‘No one will produce this film, other than me.’ Ironically, in the end, he did. But he never came on the set.”



Even though Motwane has other scripts ready, he is waiting to see the audience’s reaction to

Udaan

. “The response to this film will decide everything for me. Expectations may go up or come down. I can’t say much. I don’t know. But now with the clear multiplex audience demarcation, all movies are competing on a level ground.”