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We recommend: We scour the web for the good stuff

A Harry Potter quiz. A teen drama that takes a sensitive approach to teenage suicide.

HT48HRS_Special Updated: Apr 14, 2017 18:03 IST
Poorva Joshi
A still from Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why
A still from Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why

1) Movie recipes: “What’s better than watching a movie? Eating it,” is how each episode of Movie Recipes begins. And that’s exactly what the premise is — each video is dedicated to an iconic film, as a chef prepares the food that has been described or displayed in the film. Launched by Jeremy Scott and Chris Atkinson — the duo that also hosts Cinema Cins, a series that critiques films for its flaws — Movie Recipes looks beyond the film’s story to what really matters: food. Think the food that characters in The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit series would eat: a campfire menu with potatoes and bread, easy-to-carry foods that provide energy for long journeys (a recurring theme in the stories). As they eat, the hosts also discuss their favourite part from the film.

Available on: youtube.com

2) Forbidden Forest Quiz: The series finds its origin in the popular teen TV dramas 90210 and One Tree Hill. Expect love triangles, cheesy romance, and unrequited crushes. But what makes this one stand out is its sensitive depiction, and obvious highlighting, of inherent sexism and misogyny in the American society. For instance, take a common high school storyline — an episode dedicated to high school boys rating their female peers as per their looks and body shape. One Tree Hill actually passed this as a joke in one of their episodes. 13 Reasons..., on the other hand, replays the scenario through the eyes of the victim. The underlying objectification is emphasised masterfully. And though it is slightly high on drama, the series makes a point on the need for feminist theories to be introduced to young adults early on.

Available on: pottermore.com

3) 13 Reasons Why: The series finds its origin in the popular teen TV dramas 90210 and One Tree Hill. Expect love triangles, cheesy romance, and unrequited crushes. But what makes this one stand out is its sensitive depiction, and obvious highlighting, of inbuilt sexism and misogyny in the American society. For instance, take a common high school storyline — an episode dedicated to high school boys rating their female peers as per their looks and body shape. One Tree Hill actually passed this as a joke in one of their episodes. 13 Reasons..., on the other hand, replays the scenario through the eyes of the victim. The underlying objectification is emphasised masterfully. And though it is slightly high on drama, the series makes a point on the need for feminist theories to be introduced to young adults early on.

Available on: netflix.com