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Ban size zero in fashion world

When extremely skinny models walked the ramp for designer Gianfranco Ferre at the recently concluded Milan Fashion Week, the issue of underweight models returned to the fore.

fashion and trends Updated: Oct 05, 2011 16:49 IST
Gursaakshi Sahni
Cowgirl-A-model-walks-the-ramp-in-black-frayed-pants-and-cowboy-hat-at-Milan-fashion-week
Cowgirl-A-model-walks-the-ramp-in-black-frayed-pants-and-cowboy-hat-at-Milan-fashion-week

When extremely skinny models walked the ramp for designer Gianfranco Ferre at the recently concluded Milan Fashion Week, the issue of underweight models returned to the fore. Ferre’s models looked dilapidated as they walked the ramp exposing their protruding clavicles and bony chests. Back in 2006, very thin models were formally banned from the runway shows in Milan, to promote healthier bodies.



There was an agreement signed between the city and its fashion industry, which prevented models with a BMI (Body Mass Index) of less than 18.5 from walking the ramp in Milan’s fashion shows. While there has been so much talk about banning the size zero craze from the modelling world, this resurfacing of lanky models may create a negative impact on women influencing their notions about their looks.



While the west has criticised the craze, Indian designers back home too feel that it’s about time that real looking women walked the ramp. Designer Leena Singh says, “Very thin models look undernourished. The curvaceous models look beautiful and healthy, thus enhancing the beauty of the clothes.” She adds, “Skinny models are not an effective way of showcasing the collection to sell the clothes to other women, as the clothes are sold to the real women who are generally not so lean healthy.”



Designer Nikhita Tandon says, “I prefer size 4 for models. Clothes too look more wearable on them.” However designer Dev R Nil has a different take on the issue. He says, “We as a nation are used to seeing fuller figures. Hence, when we see models of such stature, it makes us think that these models must be starving themselves to keep a figure like that, which, on the contrary, is not true. It’s the discretion of the designers whether they want to use them or not, depending on whether they suit the look of their collection.”