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Building blocks that rock

fashion-and-trends Updated: Mar 31, 2011 16:07 IST
Rochelle Pinto
Rochelle Pinto
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Debutante jewellery designer Tania Fadte is every fashion follower’s dream. The self-taught ingénue doesn’t like charging for her work, and often lands up giving away her quirky neckpieces for free. “Someone recently called to order a piece and I told her it would cost Rs 2,000. But I felt so guilty later than I just gave it to her for free,” says the 30-year-old sheepishly, adding that she’s never actually sold a piece till date, only making stuff pro bono for friends and family, because she feels she’s not qualified and shouldn’t be charging money for a hobby.



Her debut collection, Pixie Tea, which she plans to stock in Sasha’s Shop in her hometown Goa, has been created out of Lego blocks. “I started making pieces when I was working as a stylist for a fashion magazine about five years ago. It was the dearth of interesting jewellery that triggered my designs,” she recalls, adding, “I started by creating jewellery out of bright neon strings. And then, one day, I just brought home a Lego set and started experimenting.”



Her plan was to create headgear and bowties out of Lego blocks arranged to form hearts, an idea that generated plenty of positive response. “I made a bowtie for a friend of mine, Divyak D’Souza, to wear to Fashion Week and people there loved it,” she says.



While the Lego collection will be retailed from Rs 1,500 onwards, it’s a study in versatility since the brooches double up as bowties and the cuffs can also be used as headpieces. So does she plan to pursue a course in design to help allay her guilt over the price tags? “I intend to further my education, maybe in Japan. Growing up in Goa, we made our own clothes using sewing machines. So I wasn’t afraid to pick up a pair of scissors and play with fabric. I may do a course, but I’d rather learn on the job,” she says.