Go cashless: Delhi replaces cash with cheques in ‘shagun ka lifafa’ | fashion and trends | Hindustan Times
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Go cashless: Delhi replaces cash with cheques in ‘shagun ka lifafa’

With Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes demonetised, the shagun envelope now holds only cheques. Some are also opting for digital wallets.

fashion and trends Updated: Nov 19, 2016 07:58 IST
Prerna Gauba
Shadi

Many in the city are doing so since Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes were demonetised.(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

The cash crunch continues. It’s been 10 days since Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes were demonetised. And, while most of us are sparingly spending cash, sometimes it’s inevitable. For instance, at wedding functions, when you have to give shagun (money given as gift) to the bride and groom.

One way out is to give presents instead. But then, money would help the newlyweds buy what they really want. Fret not! Delhiites always have a solution. Just put cheques in the envelopes, instead! “My friend’s son was getting married and we all gave cheques. There is no other and simpler way to give shagun,” says Priya Arora, a 40-year-old homemaker. Another city resident, Mona Bhardwaj, did the same.

Not just cheques instead of shagun money, many are also opting for digital wallets.

Options abound, you can even opt for mobile wallets. “I was cashless, so I gave a friend Rs 2,000 for his wedding through mobile wallet,” says Akhilesh Sood, a 20-year-old hotelier. Paytm, MobiKwik, PayUmoney and many other digital wallets are now a way to go about gifting too. Moreover, India is now adapting to registering gifts. Websites are encouraging people to go for gift vouchers and online transactions.

“Several brides and grooms were on the fence. But after this move, many thought this was the need of the hour and went for registering their wedding gifts,” says Sudha Maheshwari, founder of an online wedding gift registry.

Even banks in Delhi are offering gift vouchers that can be used as debit card. “I transferred money into my bank’s gift debit card and gave it to a friend,” says Shruti Anand, a 26-year-old analyst. “I told everyone to give cheques addressed to me. We couldn’t mention it on the cards as they were already printed. We have got almost 40 cheques at the wedding reception held in Delhi,” adds Shakuntala, whose son got married last week. Now that’s a win-win situation, right?