Leather it out | fashion and trends | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 22, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Leather it out

HT City asked some Indian designers if they would prefer using real animal hide given a option or would they rather play safe by using faux leather?

fashion and trends Updated: Dec 11, 2009 20:22 IST
Shweta Jain

Biker jackets, ride-in boots, skinny pants and panel skirts are a few leather essentials, this winter. But animal skin might see a few raised eyebrows. Similarly, fur is completely out of question on the desi ramp. In the West, on the other hand, both are commonly seen on the ramp.

International celebs too are seen casually sporting bustiers by Diesel, boots by Fendi, skirts by Givenchy and so on.

HT City asked some Indian designers if they would prefer using real animal hide given a option or would they rather play safe by using faux leather?

Designer Prashant Verma says, “I think the whole talk of cruelty to animals is irrelevant. Even plants are living beings. In that case, we shouldn’t be using cotton and silk either. Unfortunately, in India only sheep, goat, cow and buffalo leather is available, and there are a lot of legalities involved in importing exotic leather. We don’t get skins of pythons or crocodiles, which are the most exciting to work on. I appreciate Paris-based designer Rick Owens who makes amazing leather garments.”

Designer Puja Nayyar says she uses faux leather, which works much better than real one. “Firstly, here we get only buff and cow leather which are very thick and hard. Secondly, we don’t have high-end technologies like cutting laser finesse, foil printing, metallic treatments, which can help treat a leather garment in many ways. So it’s about availability, more than our choice here.”

According to Nayyar, leather is good in design detailing on wing collars and French cuffs. “It can also be used in construction details on woven or knit fabric jerseys, or as intelligent pattern. Chocolate, metallics, burnished gold and bronze are the colours this season,” she says.

Footwear designer Swati Mehrotra says, “Skins of snakes and crocodiles are banned in India. And Salmon fish leather is also not available here. Though really good quality sheepskin is very expensive, most of it is exported and difficult to procure. Both cow skin and pig skin one can’t use for religious sentiments attached to them, though pig leather is best for lining of shoes.”