Now, wear clothes made of milk! | fashion and trends | Hindustan Times
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Now, wear clothes made of milk!

fashion and trends Updated: May 06, 2011 14:48 IST
Rochelle Pinto
Rochelle Pinto
Hindustan Times
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Granny said milk would strengthen your bones, but who knew it would also be good for your skin? Ela, an eco-friendly label by Joyjit Talukdar, has used milk protein to create a stretch jersey fabric, which is best suited for the city’s sultry weather. “We use soya bean extracts and regenerated milk protein to create garments that breath-easy and feel soft to the touch. Mixed with cotton, the texture is also luxurious and has a slight sheen that is otherwise missing from regular organic cotton,” he explains. With a completely green line that ranges from Rs. 6,000 - Rs. 12,000, Talukdar admits that sales have spiked in the summer. “The dresses are easy luxury, because I’ve always designed for women who enjoy dressing up. Also, they are perfect for summer soirees and brunches, where you need to be comfortable but slightly formal,” he adds. Talukdar’s clothing can be found at Bombay Electric in Colaba.

Another form of fabric that can help you beat the heat is bamboo. Many designers and eco-conscious city stores have started stocking up on clothes made in bamboo-cotton blends, which have been gaining popularity among shoppers this summer. “People prefer these fabrics when shopping for their children. The advantage bamboo fabric has is that it is soft and doesn't cause allergies, so it’s suitable for both kids and adults in the summer,” says Urvashi Mody of city store, Eco Corner, Atria Mall.

Designer duo Didier Lecoanet and Hemant Sagar have used the principles of Ayurveda to create Ayurganic, a line of garments that actually work for the wearer. Sagar reveals that the garments are infused in oil, which is made from the same composition that is otherwise incorporated in Ayurvedic massages and medicines. “These oils permeate the garments and enter the skin of the wearer,” he explains, adding, “During our team's travel to Kerala, they came across the ancient history of Vedic healthcare and translated that chance finding into a line of clothing.”