Amazon India Fashion Week: Shoemakers are no less than surgeons | fashion and trends | Hindustan Times
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Amazon India Fashion Week: Shoemakers are no less than surgeons

Italian shoes and bags remain the most coveted fashion accessories, and it was concluded that a two-way exchange of craft and technology needs to take place between India and Italy, at this round table discussion held at the recently fashion week in the Capital.

fashion and trends Updated: Oct 18, 2016 08:57 IST
Etti Bali
The event was hosted by Francesco Pensabene, Trade Commissioner to India, Embassy of Italy, New Delhi and Sunil Sethi, President FDCI.
The event was hosted by Francesco Pensabene, Trade Commissioner to India, Embassy of Italy, New Delhi and Sunil Sethi, President FDCI. (Waseem Gashroo/HT)

A talk on trends with partner country of fashion week, Italy, hosted by Francesco Pensabene, Trade Commissioner to India, Embassy of Italy, and Sunil Sethi, president, FDCI, took place at NSIC grounds on Friday. The discussion, a part of the just concluded Amazon India Fashion Week, involved Salina Ferreti, VP, Assocalzaturifici, Orietta Pelizzari, trends analyst, Maria Soriano, fashion trend specialist, and fashion designers Sanchita Ajjampur and Rajesh Pratap Singh.

The participants spoke about the two-way exchange of craft and technology between Italy and India. Ferretti says, “Footwear is more complex than other fashion accessories, and great designers and accessories can be found in Italy’s footwear districts. We hope Indian stylists become a part of it.”

Ajjampur, who showed a video of her visit to Italy, believes that it takes a bit of magic to make a shoe. “Shoes are an object of desire. My work starts from the bottom up; I look at feet and then move up. Shoemakers are no less than surgeons and a lot of components and people come together to make footwear.”

The panel agreed that India can learn a lot from Italy about merging technology with creativity. Rajesh Pratap Singh says, “We made some wrong policies in the 60s and 70s. We couldn’t marry our craft with technology and discipline that Italy follows. That’s why they are on top. We are now trying to learn.”