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Tryst with traditions: Dastkar Fair puts the spotlight on handicrafts

A Dastkar fair featuring the creations of designers working with traditional handicraft-skills offers buying options for both the self and the home.

fashion and trends Updated: Jan 23, 2016 13:28 IST
Poulomi Banerjee
Poulomi Banerjee
Hindustan Times
Dastkar Fair

The Dastkar Design Fair 2016 features the creations of over 70 designers working with traditional handicraft-skills.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

The Sun must be a shopaholic. After two days of painful near-disappearance and abandoning Delhiites to the sudden drop in temperature, it rose bright and warm on Thursday, as Dastkar opened the gates to the third edition of its annual Design Fair, making it a perfect afternoon to browse and buy.

(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Featuring the creations of designers working with traditional handicraft-skills in handloom textiles, embroidery, garments, jewellery, accessories, home decor items and furniture, the 12-day fair has drawn about 76 participants from across the country.

(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

“The annual Dastkar Design Fair is an opportunity for young craftspeople and crafts entrepreneurs who are working with different craft forms, techniques and materials to showcase their creativity and enter the urban retail space that is otherwise beyond their means. It also affords an opportunity for young entrepreneurs and designers to meet, interact and dialogue with young craftspeople — exchanging ideas, skills and experiences,” says Dastkar chairperson Laila Tyabji.

(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

If Nomad offers skirts and garments inspired by rustic wear, Manas K Ghorai from West Bengal has jewellery, handloom saris and blouses fashioned out of gamchha (or cotton towels) and Read India brings skirts and dresses in contemporary designs fashioned out of traditional Manipuri handloom.

(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Karmantik gives a quirky twist to leather shoes and Sameer Designs from Kashmir has exquisite embroidered curtains for the house. Jayati Mehta with studio pottery, Pankaja Sethi from Odisha with Ikat weaves and Shunya with Batik designs, are some of the other participants.

(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Weekends will include cultural performances, the first of which, on January 24 will be a Nati folk dance performance from Kulu. Cuisine from Afghanistan, Bengal, Bihar, Delhi, Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Hyderabad, Punjab and Tamil Nadu add just the right bite of spice to the entire experience.

Read: How Suket Dhir won the International Woolmark Prize using Indian weaves