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FA request ‘unfettered disclosure’ of evidence that led to Allardyce exit

football Updated: Sep 30, 2016 13:45 IST
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A long-running investigation by the newspaper was printed this week, which resulted in Sam Allardyce being sacked as England manager. (AFP)

The Football Association (FA) have urged the Daily Telegraph to provide “full and unfettered disclosure of all available material” following allegations of corruption by the newspaper.

A long-running investigation by the newspaper was printed this week, which resulted in Sam Allardyce being sacked as England manager and eight current and former Premier League managers accused of receiving ‘bungs’, or illicit payments, for player transfers.

Read | ‘Disappointed’ Sam Allardyce forced to leave England job after newspaper sting

Southampton assistant manager Eric Black was named in the newspaper investigation, though he has denied the allegations, while Barnsley assistant Tommy Wright, who also denied any wrongdoing, was sacked by his club.

“We have requested full and unfettered disclosure of all available material from the Daily Telegraph,” the FA said in a statement on their website (www.thefa.com). “This is yet to be provided.

“The FA wants to be in a position to investigate these matters fully at the earliest opportunity and to this end the FA will also be meeting with the City of London Police next week.

“The FA treats any allegations of this nature seriously and is committed to investigating them thoroughly, in conjunction with any other appropriate body.”

Allardyce was sacked on Tuesday after the FA said he had behaved inappropriately following secret filming that showed him offering advice to businessmen on how to circumvent rules on player transfers.

Gareth Southgate will take charge of England’s next four matches against Malta, Slovenia, Scotland and Spain.