Few cops on road in city, residents control traffic | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Few cops on road in city, residents control traffic

Unlike several cities where traffic police manages vehicular movement, in Gurgaon daily commuters and residents in their civil clothes are seen standing at intersections trying to manage traffic movement.

gurgaon Updated: Jul 13, 2016 15:19 IST
Isha Sahni
Residents control traffic

Less number of traffic cops, faulty traffic signals and ever-growing number of private vehicles on the city roads have forced the people to take the job of traffic management in their hands.(HT Photo)

Angad Sharma, a resident of Delhi and daily commuter, was travelling to a mall on MG road during the evening peak hours. The moment Angad reached the intersection near Huda City Centre metro station, he realised that the traffic signal is not working and that the people are trying to cross each other. He patiently waited for 20 minutes but after seeing no improvement, Angad and his three friends got to the job of managing traffic.

“We knew that the situation will only worsen. There were auto rickshaws, buses, cars and even people trying to find the tiniest place to move. We knew if the traffic situation is not resolved now, it will never be. Us, group of friends, were there for more than an hour and left the place only after the peak hours were over,” said Angad.

Unlike several cities where traffic police manages vehicular movement, in Gurgaon daily commuters and residents in their civil clothes are seen standing at intersections trying to manage traffic movement.

Less number of traffic cops, faulty traffic signals and ever-growing number of private vehicles on the city roads have forced the people to take the job of traffic management in their hands.

“If the people do not come on the road and manage traffic, the jams will never end. The people do not follow traffic signals and if the lights are not functional, the commuters do not stop. They would stand, honking for hours, but let another person get ahead of them. In such desperate times, often someone or the other takes the task of clearing the jams,” said Akshita Sapra, a daily commuter.

During morning and peak hours all the major roads of Gurgaon face huge traffic snarls due to high volume of traffic. The situation is worsened by unruly auto rickshaws and pedestrians stepping on the road. Despite this, it is very rare that the police officials come to the peoples’ rescue immediately.

Sarita Malik, a daily commuter, said, “We were standing near the South City 1 intersection on the Sector 30-31 road for more than half-an-hour. The Sector 40 police station is not even a kilometre away from the crossing but no police official came to help. Infact, we saw a police vehicle using the localities’ lanes to ignore the traffic. Finally, tired of waiting I stepped forward and helped manage the traffic.”

Malik stood at the junction, ignoring random comments from men and almost being run-over by a SUV, for more than 40 minutes.

“I do not expect a bravery award but I want the police to become more efficient. Or at least see that the signals are functional,” she added.

The traffic police cops said that only 335 cops have been given the task to manage lakhs of vehicles.

“The traffic police is trying its best to manage the traffic. We are also seeking help from the local bodies to install CCTV cameras and more traffic signals to manage traffic properly. The police recognises the major issue of jams here and is doing its best to solve it,” said ACP Hawa Singh.

Gurgaon: A Delhi resident and daily commuter to Gurgaon, Angad Sharma, was visiting a mall in MG Road one evening when he reached the intersection near Huda City Centre metro station and found chaos around him. The traffic signal was not working and vehicles from all sides were trying to cross all at once. He and his three friends waited in their car for 20 minutes, but after seeing no improvement in the situation, they got out and began to manage traffic themselves.

“We knew the situation would only worsen. There were auto rickshaws, buses, cars and pedestrians too trying to find the tiniest place to move. We knew if the traffic situation was not resolved then, it would never be. I and my friends were there for more than an hour and left the place only after the peak hours passed,” said Sharma.

Unlike several cities where the traffic police manage vehicular movement, in Gurgaon daily commuters and residents are often seen standing in civil clothes at intersections trying to manage traffic.

Low traffic police deployment, faulty signals and an ever-growing number of private vehicles due to lack of good public transport have forced commuters and residents to take matters in their own hands.

“If people do not come on the road and manage traffic, the jams will never end. Commuters do not follow traffic signals and do not stop if the lights are not functional. They will stand there, honking for hours, but not let another person pass. In such desperate times, someone or the other takes up the job of clearing the jams,” said Akshita Sapra, a daily commuter.

During morning and evening peak hours all major roads of Gurgaon face huge snarls due to high volume of traffic. The situation is worsened by unruly auto rickshaws and pedestrians coming on to the roads. Despite this, it is very rare that police officials reach the spot immediately.

Sarita Malik, a daily commuter, said, “We were standing near the South City 1 intersection on the Sector 30-31 road for more than half an hour once. The Sector 40 police station is less than a kilometre away from the crossing, but no police official came to help. In fact, we saw a police vehicle using the area’s by-lanes to ignore the traffic. Finally, tired of waiting I stepped forward and helped manage the traffic.”

Malik says she stood at the junction for more than 40 minutes, ignoring comments from men and almost being run over by a SUV.

“I do not expect a bravery award, but I want the police to be more efficient. Or at least see to it that the signals are functional,” she added.

Traffic police officials said only 335 personnel have been deployed to manage the city’s roads.

“The traffic police is trying its best to manage traffic. We are also seeking help from the local bodies to install CCTV cameras and more traffic signals to do the job properly. The police recognises the major issue of jams here and is doing its best to solve it,” said Hawa Singh, ACP (traffic).