Gurgaon: Filling of water pits in parched Aravalli forest underway | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon: Filling of water pits in parched Aravalli forest underway

The Haryana forest department had dug up five new water pits in Rojka Gujjar, near the Bandhwari (Gurgaon-faridabad Road) and in Mandawar forest areas to provide relief to the wildlife and also to reduce the man-animal conflict

gurgaon Updated: Apr 11, 2017 23:32 IST
HT Correspondent
Aravallis

It gets very difficult for the pits in the Aravalli forest to be filled with water during peak summer months.(FILE PHOTO)

The scorching summer sun has sent the wildlife in the Aravalli forest region scrambling for water. Alarmed over rising incidents of leopards and hyenas venturing into the human habitation in the region, the forest department on Tuesday started filling up the water pits in Aravallis.

The animals come out of the forest area in search of water during summer, as the Aravalli hills dry out completely.

“An order has been issued to six districts of South Haryana to fill the pits with water. The process of filling the pits has started. In Gurgaon, we have five water pits. It requires more than 6,000 liters of water to fill one pit,” MD Sinha, conservator of forest, South Haryana, said.

The department has only one tanker, which has a capacity of 3,000 liters of water.

The department had dug up five new water pits in Rojka Gujjar, near the Bandhwari (Gurgaon-faridabad Road) and in Mandawar forest areas to provide relief to the wildlife and also to reduce the man-animal conflict. These were mining pits, which were later developed by the forest department as a source of water for the animals. Even trails were created to enable the animals to reach the pits.

Read I Over 200 trees axed in the Aravallis, forest officials promise action

Prime locations where the animal strayings have been mostly recorded over the last two months, include Mahendergard, Bhindawas, Nahar and Mebla Maharajpur.

The wild life department will monitor the animals in the Aravallis to make sure that they do not enter civilian areas. “It is especially hard to store water in the Aravallis in summer as the rocky and sandy terrain make it difficult to hold water. Hence, the animals inhabiting the forest have no option but to stray into civilian areas to quench their thirst,” he said.

At present, the residents are also facing a water supply crisis owing to the shifting of water lines to enable uninterrupted construction work at Rajiv Chowk, Signature Tower and other areas of the city and the ongoing de-silting process at the Basai water treatment plant.