Gurgaon forest department creates water pits for animals in Aravallis | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon forest department creates water pits for animals in Aravallis

gurgaon Updated: Jun 07, 2016 16:15 IST
Isha Sahni
Isha Sahni
Hindustan Times
Aravallis

The region has recorded a temperature of 46 degree Celsius and as the Aravallis do not hold any water during this time of the year, water pits are being filled.(Abhinav Saha/HT Photo)

Relieving animals from the scorching heat, the forest department has created water pits in the Aravallis. These pits were created around a week ago and are helping animals to have easy access to water.

The region has recorded a temperature of 46 degrees Celsius and as the Aravallis do not hold any water during this time of the year, water pits are being filled by the forest officials, said an official from the forest department.

Read more: NCZ area in Aravallis increased, says report

Over 20 pits, about two to three feet deep, have been dug at prime sights on the Dum Duma Lake- Bhandwari stretch and the Manesar stretch. The pits were made inside the forest, away from the villages so domestic animals do not flock here.

“Water pits have been created to provide water to wild animals in peak summers. This will help in saving the animals from the heat and also provide them with some much-needed relief,” said MD Sinha, conservator of forest (south circle).

As part of the initiative, areas with wildlife presence were identified by the department with the help of the Wildlife Institute of India (WII).

Read more: Grasslands to be made for blackbucks in Gurgaon

“A lot of help to create the depression points was taken by WII. After their survey, forest rangers started their work. It took approximately `5,000 to create the pits,” he said.

The department also plans to preserve old water bodies in the Aravallis by using these pits. The department said that in the monsoon, these holes will be filled by rainwater and help in restoring ground water table. Water pits in the Aravallis will change the plight of the wild animals, he said.