Gurgaon hospital inserts smallest pacemaker in 89-year patient | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon hospital inserts smallest pacemaker in 89-year patient

A city hospital inserted the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia -- a condition in which the heart beats very slow — in an 89-year-old Delhi resident on Wednesday.

gurgaon Updated: Jun 03, 2016 00:07 IST
Isha Sahni
Gurgaon
At 2 grams, doctors at Medanta - The Medicity claim that this is the world’s smallest pacemaker. Courtesy: Medanta

A city hospital inserted the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia -- a condition in which the heart beats very slow — in an 89-year-old Delhi resident on Wednesday.

The pacemaker, comparable to the size of a vitamin capsule, was inserted in the patient’s body in a surgery that lasted only 30 minutes at Medanta- The Medicity. The new pacemaker is merely 2 grams compared to the 25 grams instrument used conventionally.

“I am happy that my body was not cut open for placing the pacemaker. When the doctor told us about the capsule-sized pacemaker, we were not sure but the insertion did not take time and was painless,” the patient who lives in Civil Lines, Delhi, said.

Recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Micra Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS) is placed inside the heart through a keyhole puncture in the groin. Unlike traditional pacemakers, the device does not require cardiac wires (leads) or a surgical pocket under the skin to deliver a pacing therapy. “The latest innovation in pacemaker technology coupled with the minimally invasive procedure increases the benefit to a patient manifold. Not only is Micra TPS device MRI compatible, it also does not have wires like other traditional pacemakers that reduce the risks of infections caused due to wires,” Dr. Balbir Singh, chairman of Department of EP & Pacing and senior interventional cardiologist at Medanta hospital, said.

The Micra TPS also incorporates a retrieval feature. However, the device is designed to be left in the body.

“As the device is leadless, the chances of infection or dislodging the lead goes down. That is the benefit of the new device. The only limitation is that it is a single chamber ventricular pacemaker, which means it works on only the lower chambers,” Dr VK Bahl, head of the department of cardiology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences that participated in the international trial for the device, said.

“The first implant was placed in India at AIIMS about a year back. Four or five other centres including city’s Govind Ballabh Pant hospital and a centre from Hyderabad and Bangalore each participated in the trial from India,” he said.