Gurgaon Police to outsource ‘routine’ tasks to agencies, focus on security | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon Police to outsource ‘routine’ tasks to agencies, focus on security

The Haryana government has proposed the outsourcing of non-core functions of the police such as serving of summons, issuance of driving licences, verification of arms licence and traffic control functions etc to free the force for priority tasks.

gurgaon Updated: Apr 16, 2013 00:54 IST
HT Correspondent

The Haryana government has proposed the outsourcing of non-core functions of the police such as serving of summons, issuance of driving licences, verification of arms licence and traffic control functions etc to free the force for priority tasks.

The government said these functions should be handed over to outsourced agencies in a phased manner after giving them necessary training.

The state government is mulling to provide on-the-spot driving licences to people on payment of an extra fee of R5,100. These will be provided by private agencies at the proposed e-disha lounges, which will be especially created for this purpose.

The government is also mulling to launch an air-conditioned e-Disha Lounge in Gurgaon. The facility will be equipped with sofa sets, coffee/tea dispensing machines, trained staff etc.

Some of the suggestions were proposed by Haryana chief minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda during a conference on administrative reforms in New Delhi on Monday.

Haryana Parliamentary affairs minister Randeep Singh Surjewala represented the state on Hooda’s behalf.

Union home minister Sushil Kumar Shinde, RPN Singh, minister of state in the ministry of home affairs, chief ministers and home ministers of states also attended the conference.

Hooda in his speech said the state government had communicated its detailed response to the 153 recommendations included in the Administrative Reforms Commission (ARC) report.

“In view of the ARC suggestions, Haryana had set up the state police board to serve as an overall supervisory body at the highest level. It aids and advises the state government, frames policy guidelines for prompt efficient, responsive and accountable policing and evaluates organisational performance of the police service in the state,” added Hooda.

“With wide-ranging functions and powers of the board, besides well laid-out procedures and rules, we haven’t felt the need to have more institutions or boards in the administrative structure of the state police,” he added.

Haryana has also set up a Police Complaints Authority to serve as a watchdog on the police force within the ambit of the Police Act.