Gurgaon residents launch campaign against water crisis | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon residents launch campaign against water crisis

To raise the issue of water scarcity in south Haryana, residents of the city launched a signature campaign on Saturday. Dhananjay Jha reports.

gurgaon Updated: May 27, 2012 00:34 IST
Dhananjay Jha

To raise the issue of water scarcity in south Haryana, residents of the city launched a signature campaign on Saturday.


The campaign was undertaken to put pressure on the ministry of water resources to construct Lakhwar, Kesao and Renuka dams on the Yamuna, Tons and Giri, respectively.

The dams will help augmentation of water in the Tajewala Barrage throughout the year and supply adequate water to the western Yamuna canal to feed south Haryana, including Gurgaon.

“Water scarcity has been a perennial problem in Gurgaon with no signs of solution in the immediate future,” said RS Rathee, president of the Gurgaon Citizens Council (GCC), which has launched the campaign.

“The aim is to spread awareness among people on the water crisis in Haryana and negligence on the part of the state government and Centre,” he added. Birender Singh, general secretary, All India Congress Committee and Rajya Sabha member, was also present at the meeting and assured to take up the issue with Pawan Bansal, minister of water resources.

Gurgaon and south Haryana receive water from the western Yamuna canal, the capacity of which is 13,000 cusecs.

During the rainy season, the canal is filled to capacity, but hardly receives 2,000-3,000 cusecs during the remaining months. Of this, 600 cusecs is supplied to Delhi.

“Constructing dams will save the water of Yamuna, which goes to waste during the rainy season. This water can be stored and diverted to the western canal, which could supply water to south Haryana,” said Birender Singh.

Minister of water resources Pawan Bansal denied that the Centre was to be blamed.

“Yamuna basin states need to settle their disputes. In 1994, the states had signed an agreement with the Centre. Another agreement had to be signed between the states over water and power sharing. It is yet to be signed,” said Bansal.