Gurgaon: Rules should be equal for all, say tenants of Essel Towers’ Pilot Court | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 15, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Gurgaon: Rules should be equal for all, say tenants of Essel Towers’ Pilot Court

The tenants of Essel Towers’ Pilot Court, an upscale condominium at MG Road, are up against the RWA members for creating “discrimination” in the society. The tenants said that the new rules of preventing guests of the tenants to enter the building after 10 pm to 8 am should be applicable to the entire society and not just tenants.

gurgaon Updated: Aug 08, 2017 23:16 IST
Ipsita Pati
Essel Towers had recently come up with new rules that prevented guests of the tenants to enter the building after 10 pm to 8 am.
Essel Towers had recently come up with new rules that prevented guests of the tenants to enter the building after 10 pm to 8 am.

The tenants of Essel Towers’ Pilot Court, an upscale condominium at MG Road, are up against the RWA members for creating “discrimination” in the society. The tenants said that the new rules of preventing guests of the tenants to enter the building after 10 pm to 8 am should be applicable to the entire society and not just tenants.

The Essel Towers’ Pilot Court RWA stopped guests of single tenants on Friday and also allegedly misbehaved with the tenants.

“We are facing discrimination. Why are the new restrictions only for tenants? Just because we are from outside and we are facing these absurd rules that do not make sense. If these rules are for safety purpose then it should be for all. We live in a democracy and we have equal rights,” said Meghna Aggarwal, a tenant said.

The tenants alleged the society has planned a strategy to “remove the single tenants” from Essel Towers’ Pilot Court.

Not just the opposite gender guests, the society also framed rules that even same gender guests cannot stay overnight at the tenants’ place.

“We are fine with ID cards, but these rules do not make sense at all. If they have any objections with any illegal activities in rented accommodation then the RWA should talk to the owner of the house,” said Shubham Sharma, a tenant.

Another tenant Nikita Arora said, “I don’t think it’s okay for the RWA to try and regulate our private affairs. Who visits our homes and who spends the night at our place is our business. As long as, we do not cause nuisance to the society, there should be no issue. We have agreed to co-operate with the society and even suggested that they issue visitor ID cards to regular visitors and issue visitor passes to casual visitors. In addition, we have agreed to personal responsibility for our guests”.

The differences between the RWA members and the tenants came to light on Friday when RWA members prevented opposite gender guests of the tenants from entering into the building of Essel Towers’ Pilot Court.

Earlier, the decision of not allowing single tenants to invite guests of opposite gender at Essel Towers was passed in April that also led to tussle between RWA and tenants. The Essel Towers have six residential towers and the April order was meant for five towers.

Captain (retd) SP Sinha, Pilot Court RWA member, said, “The society can frame any rule any time. The tenants have to follow it. We are in our 70s and we do not want to wake up at the middle of the night because of loud music.”

The society was also in news on April 13 when it has issued a notice to the owners not to rent out house to single tenants. A week earlier the ETRWA had circulated a notice on April 7 stating that people of opposite sex could not visit each other unless they are immediate family members.