How Gurgaon’s growth story turned sour | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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How Gurgaon’s growth story turned sour

gurgaon Updated: Nov 06, 2012 00:47 IST
Anumod G. Sharma
Anumod G. Sharma
Hindustan Times
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When the Haryana government began developing Gurgaon, it was envisaged to be a world-class model city with international standards of roads and other civic amenities. However, thanks to shoddy infrastructure, the Millennium City dream has gone sour.

In the earlier years of its development, the city became synonymous with young professionals, technology firms and high-end restaurants.

The development took a frantic pace and everyone wanted their share of the lucrative pie. Big names such as Citibank, Motorola, IBM, Oberoi, Trident and Westin entered the city with a lot of hope. There was a frantic spurt in development of malls; it was almost being called the shopping capital of Asia.

With so much of positive activity, why is gloom prevailing in the air? Why are residents and companies feeling cheated? Why has Gurgaon's sheen worn off? The first and foremost problem to be tackled is infrastructure.Among the newly-developed cities of India, this is probably the only city which is facing maximum problems related to water, electricity and bad roads. The idea behind building a world-class city was noble, but it wasn't backed up with proper implementation. The nexus of builders and government has killed the entire development plan.

Residential areas were developed without keeping in mind the basic needs of residents. There are vehicles with no parking space - even when 40 per cent of the flats are yet to be occupied. On an average, the denizens get only 60 per cent of their electricity requirement met. Looking at this gloomy scenario, very soon residents will have to depend on tankers to meet their water requirements.

Noida, another satellite town to Delhi, is connected with six artery roads. Compare that to Gurgaon, which is only connected to two roads, and you understand why commuting is such a nightmare to-and-fro the city.

(The writer is a resident of Malibu Town)