Once lush and green, Gurgaon Sector 47 pond has now been filled up | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Once lush and green, Gurgaon Sector 47 pond has now been filled up

he water bodies chosen to be revived and increase the city’s depleting groundwater were Basai, Dhanwapur, Badshapur, Sukhrali, Ghata, Jharsa, Begumpur Khatola, Garauli Kalan, Sarai Alawardi, Jahazgarh, Kadipur and Sarhol. Of these, visits to Jharsa and Badshahpur revealed that their fate is still uncertain.

gurgaon Updated: Mar 21, 2017 21:59 IST
Kartik Kumar
Residents have filled up the Sector 47 pond to create a shorter path between residential colonies in the sector.
Residents have filled up the Sector 47 pond to create a shorter path between residential colonies in the sector.(Sanjeev Verma/HT PHOTO)

Until last year, there was a pond in Sector 47 filled with green algae, plastic and garbage. It served its purpose during monsoon when it accumulated run-off water from nearby areas and served as a catchment pit. This ensured that there was no waterlogging in the residential areas nearby.

However, a visit to the site revealed that the pond does not exist anymore. Residents have filled it up to create a shorter path between residential colonies in the sector.

“The pond served no purpose and had become a site for mosquito breeding. Filling it up was the logical choice as it reduced the distance between residential colonies,” said Vijender Kapila of Sector 47.

Until last year, there was a pond in Sector 47 filled with green algae, plastic and garbage. It served its purpose during monsoon when it accumulated run-off water from nearby areas and served as a catchment pit. (HT Photo)

In a way, the pond reflects the condition of the 120 water bodies spread across the city. Of these, the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG) had last year shortlisted 12 water bodies to serve as catchment areas after being revived by the civic body. However, many continue to be encroached upon or serve as landfill sites.

The water bodies chosen to be revived and increase the city’s depleting groundwater were Basai, Dhanwapur, Badshapur, Sukhrali, Ghata, Jharsa, Begumpur Khatola, Garauli Kalan, Sarai Alawardi, Jahazgarh, Kadipur and Sarhol. Of these, visits to Jharsa and Badshahpur revealed that their fate is still uncertain.

The Jharsa bundh, a check dam built in the 19th century by Joanna Nobilis Sombre, popularly known as Begum Samru, bears little resemblance to its original form. Today, residential colonies of Sector 15 have been built nearby. In addition, the four miniature check dams left at the site are also under constant threat of being encroached upon as the MCG is yet to build a boundary wall around them.

The bundh was even made a temporary parking lot by the district administration during the Haryana Golden Jubilee Celebrations last year.

Similarly, despite carrying out anti-encroachment drives last year, the Badshahpur drain continues to be heavily encroached upon by the residents, shopkeepers and vendors of Badshahpur village.

During monsoon last year, the backwater mixed with heavy rainfall and flooded the roads of Gurgaon due to breaches in the drain. This contributed to the infamous traffic gridlock on the city’s roads that had lasted over 48 hours.

Keeping in mind last year’s monsoon, the engineering department was last month directed MCG commissioner V Umashankar to initiate measures to prevent flooding during rains. These measures include revival of water bodies to take care of run-off water.

“Work on building of artificial lakes and revival of water bodies is underway. Most of it is expected to be completed before the monsoon,” said SS Rohilla, spokesperson, MCG.