Overloaded trucks, heaps of boulders deal death blow | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Overloaded trucks, heaps of boulders deal death blow

gurgaon Updated: Mar 14, 2013 01:47 IST

Hindustan Times
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It is fast turning into a death trap owing to broken patches.

Just nine months after it became operational, the 25-km-long Gurgaon-Faridabad expressway, built at the cost of nearly Rs 800 crore, has started to wither. The surface has peeled off, giving way to potholes in the middle of the main carriageway, at several places.

The high-speed toll road — that meanders through the Aravali hills — is the only road to provide direct connectivity from Gurgaon to Faridabad, the two satellite towns of the National Capital Region, New Delhi.

While the four-lane road initially gave a smooth ride to thousands of commuters, a majority of whom work in multinational firms in the two towns, it is fast turning into a death trap owing to broken patches.

The road is mainly used by thousands of overloaded trucks carrying boulders and construction materials as there are a number of concrete crusher zones along the Expressway.

The Expressway concessionaire, GF Toll Road Private Limited, in a letter written to Haryana chief minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda in December 2012, mentioned that overloaded trucks were the main reason for damaging the road surface.

Sources said security personnel at the police posts along the expressway also allegedly turned a blind eye to thousands of overloaded trucks.

Heaps of boulders — that fall off from trucks and sometimes dropped by truck drivers at police check posts — can be found scattered on the stretch, posing a threat to commuters.

Large-scale construction work, including residential and commercial, is being carried out in the city.

With the Supreme Court imposing a blanket ban on mining in the Aravali hills, builders now source boulders, sand and other construction materials from as far as Rajasthan and elsewhere.

Even consignments bound for Delhi and other parts of the National Capital Region are transported through Gurgaon, thereby damaging city roads.

Despite these issues, inferior quality construction material has been used to build some road stretches in the city.

In January 2012, the roads of the industrial township Udyog Vihar, also gave way to cracks and potholes though they were freshly re-carpeted.

It was only after HT highlighted the plight of commuters in the area that the material used to construct roads was improved.