Remove toll plazas as initiatives to ease traffic congestion fail | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Remove toll plazas as initiatives to ease traffic congestion fail

Taking exception to its failure to decongest the 32-lane toll plaza near Ambience Mall, the Punjab and Haryana High Court in September last restrained the concessionaire, Delhi Gurgaon Super Connectivity Limited (DGSCL), from collecting toll for a fortnight.

gurgaon Updated: Aug 13, 2013 02:11 IST

Taking exception to its failure to decongest the 32-lane toll plaza near Ambience Mall, the Punjab and Haryana High Court in September last restrained the concessionaire, Delhi Gurgaon Super Connectivity Limited (DGSCL), from collecting toll for a fortnight.

The order covered the five-lane toll plaza leading to Terminal 3 of IGI Airport and the 16-lane toll gate at Kherki Daula — 18 km after the Delhi-Gurgaon toll plaza — as well.

The court was hearing a couple of petitions — one, by DGSCL seeking protection against Gurgaon police personnel allegedly letting vehicles through without charging toll in order to ease traffic, and two, by individuals seeking to bar DGSCL from collecting fees from motorists till it sorted out the traffic mess at the toll plaza.

This was followed by other experiments carried out to ease congestion on the toll plaza, such as creating split tolls and opening the boom barriers after the pile-up reached the 400-metre mark. However, none of these experiments have turned out to be a permanent solution to the daily mess at the plazas.

Experts are of the opinion that the problem lies in the designing faults and the ill-conceived Delhi-Gurgaon expressway. “It’s a complete planning failure. The National Highways Authority of India has failed to work in tandem with the Gurgaon authorities to create a transport-led infrastructure which has a bearing on not just the local traffic but also the highway traffic going beyond Kherki Daula,” said Rohit Baluja, president of the New Delhi-based Institute of Road Traffic Education. “Courts cannot solve such planning issues,” he added