Rural Gurgaon changing, voters quiz netas about wi-fi, Twitter | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 25, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Rural Gurgaon changing, voters quiz netas about wi-fi, Twitter

Long considered a rural assembly constituency, the tourist town of Sohna in Gurgaon district is fast turning into an urban hub, and its growing pool of educated and modern voters are posing tough questions to ticket-seekers hoping to win a seat here in the upcoming Haryana assembly polls.

gurgaon Updated: Sep 17, 2014 16:40 IST
Sanjeev K Ahuja

Long considered a rural assembly constituency, the tourist town of Sohna in Gurgaon district is fast turning into an urban hub, and its growing pool of educated and modern voters are posing tough questions to ticket-seekers hoping to win a seat here in the upcoming Haryana assembly polls.

Nestled near the Aravalli hills, Sohna is the smallest, by number of voters, of the four constituencies in Gurgaon district — others being Gurgaon, Badshahpur and Pataudi. It has 1.89 lakh voters of which more than 40,000 are educated urban youth attracted to the once sleepy town by an explosion of major development projects including the newly carved out Sohna extension township, numerous gated and ultra-luxury high-rise housing projects, and improving connectivity that will bring it within 10km from Gurgaon.

And the educated want a ‘connected’ leader. “Much to our surprise, the people during canvassing here ask us questions such as: Do you know about wi-fi zones? Are you on Facebook, Whatsapp or Twitter? Many of these young voters have formed online groups and now expect an educated elected MLA from here,” said one of the ticket aspirants.

The parties are responding to this. Many in the list of ticket seekers from Sohna are management graduates from domestic and foreign universities.

Sohna’s vote bank is also diverse with a majority of them Muslims, Gujjars and SC/BCs all hoping for more development, likely to be the major poll plank here.

“Gone are the days when illiterate political candidates with dubious background would rule the roost and gain power using our electorate. We are a rising community of educated urban people and expect an educated political leader to represent us and raise the issue of development,” said YN Gupta, RWA president of Sushant Lok (Phase 2) — one of 24 big new housing societies that fall under Sohna.