Black soya more effective in controlling diabetes: study | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
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Black soya more effective in controlling diabetes: study

Besides, the beans could also be effective in controlling weight, lower fat and cholesterol levels.

health and fitness Updated: Feb 26, 2007 14:12 IST

Yellow soya has been considered low caloric do far, but a team of South Korean researchers has now revealed that a diet rich in black soya beans could help control weight, lower fat and cholesterol levels, and aid in the prevention of diabetes.

The researchers, led by Shin Joung Rho at Hanyang University, Seoul, allowed 32 rats to gorge on a fatty diet, supplemented with various levels of black soya.

The results showed that, after two weeks, those getting 10 percent of their energy from black soya had gained half as much weight as those in the control group. Total blood cholesterol fell by 25 percent and LDL (so-called 'bad') cholesterol fell by 60 percent in the rats in the 10 percent group.

David Bender, sub-dean at the Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, thinks that the soya protein may be having an effect on fat metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue, reducing synthesis of new fatty acids and cholesterol. It is this metabolic effect that may explain the traditional Asian use of black soya in the treatment of diabetes.

“The key problem in type II diabetes is impairment of insulin action, mainly as a result of excess abdominal adipose tissue - so loss of weight often improves glycaemic control,” says Dr Bender.

"Soy fits in well to a healthy balanced diet which is important in preventing diabetes - low in fat, high in fibre and a good source of complex carbohydrates,” Lynne Garton, a registered dietician and nutritionist and consultant to the Soya Protein Association, said.

"Soy fits in well to a healthy balanced diet which is important in preventing diabetes - low in fat, high in fibre and a good source of complex carbohydrates,” Lynne Garton, a registered dietician and nutritionist and consultant to the Soya Protein Association, said.