Drinking during pregnancy may get even your grandkid addicted | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
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Drinking during pregnancy may get even your grandkid addicted

Worrisome as it may sound, studies suggest that a woman who drinks through her pregnancy on only makes her children susceptible to the habit, but will impact the behaviour of her grand and great grand children too.

health and fitness Updated: Feb 25, 2016 11:26 IST
Pregnancy And Alcoholism

The studies suggest that if a mother drinks during pregnancy, even just a little bit, she increases the risk that her progeny will become alcoholic.(Shutterstock)

If you thought consuming alcohol during pregnancy is fine, there’s one more reason to stop the bad habit. Studies on rats have shown that drinking during pregnancy could affect not only your child but actually increase the chances of the next three generations developing alcoholism.

“Our findings show that in rats, when a mother consumes the equivalent of one glass of wine four times during the pregnancy, her offspring and grand-offspring -- up to the third generation -- show increased alcohol preference and less sensitivity to alcohol,” said Nicole Cameron from Binghamton University in the US.

Read: Ladies, you risk stroke, heart attack if you get pregnant post 40

For the study, pregnant rats were given the equivalent of one glass of wine -- four days in a row -- at gestational days 17-20, the equivalent of the second trimester in humans. Juvenile male and female offspring were then tested for water or alcohol consumption and adolescent males were tested for sensitivity to alcohol by injecting them with a high-alcohol dose, which made them unresponsive and measuring the time it took them to recover their senses.

Read: Blood-boosters at birth could give preemies higher IQs

The results, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, suggest that if a mother drinks during pregnancy, even just a little bit, she increases the risk that her progeny will become alcoholic.

The team claims to be the first to investigate the effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and alcohol-related behaviour on generations that were not directly exposed to alcohol in the uterus during the pregnancy.