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Feeling groovy? Workout could help

health-and-fitness Updated: Mar 14, 2008 20:08 IST

Reuters
Highlight Story

Exercising as little as 10 to 30 minutes a day can make overweight or obese older women get more done and feel better about their lives, US researchers said on Thursday.

They said even women who only exercised 10 minutes a day saw significant improvements in quality of life - they had more energy, less anxiety and were simply happier.

The study is among the first to examine how exercise can improve the quality of life of postmenopausal women who were extremely out of shape but otherwise healthy, said Dr Timothy Church of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

"This is by far the largest exercise trial which has ever looked at quality of life," Church said in a telephone interview.

The results, which were presented at the American Heart Association's Conference on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism in Colorado Springs, Colorado, update a 2007 study by Church and others in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That study found women who exercised 10 to 30 minutes saw improvements in fitness. The latest findings look at other measures, such as mental health and social functioning.

The researchers studied 430 sedentary women past menopause with an average age of 57 who were assigned to one of three exercise groups: those who exercised 70 minutes a week; 135 minutes a week and 190 minutes a week.

A fourth group did not have an organized exercise program and served as a control group.

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Exercising as little as 10 to 30 minutes a day can make overweight or obese older women get more done and feel better about their lives, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.

They said even women who only exercised 10 minutes a day saw significant improvements in quality of life -- they had more energy, less anxiety and were simply happier.

The study is among the first to examine how exercise can improve the quality of life of postmenopausal women who were extremely out of shape but otherwise healthy, said Dr. Timothy Church of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

"This is by far the largest exercise trial which has ever looked at quality of life," Church said in a telephone interview.

The results, which were presented at the American Heart Association's Conference on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism in Colorado Springs, Colorado, update a 2007 study by Church and others in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That study found women who exercised 10 to 30 minutes saw improvements in fitness. The latest findings look at other measures, such as mental health and social functioning.

The researchers studied 430 sedentary women past menopause with an average age of 57 who were assigned to one of three exercise groups: those who exercised 70 minutes a week; 135 minutes a week and 190 minutes a week.

A fourth group did not have an organized exercise program and served as a control group.