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Health Scan

When it comes to processed food, the world cannot have enough. Nestle, Coca Cola and McDonalds ranked 8, 11 and 12 among the Top 100 brands in Asia-Pacific region, ahead of familiar names such as Nike, Nokia and Colgate.

health and fitness Updated: Jul 31, 2010 23:46 IST

Win for big food brands
When it comes to processed food, the world cannot have enough. Nestle, Coca Cola and McDonalds ranked 8, 11 and 12 among the Top 100 brands in Asia-Pacific region, ahead of familiar names such as Nike, Nokia and Colgate. The Asia Pacific's Top 1000 Brand Survey covered markets such as Australia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand.

Eat fish to ward off dementia
It's a different story for people over 60. Vitamins D and E help keep the mind sharper, ward off degenerative brain illnesses such as dementia and Parkinson's disease, report three new studies. Vitamin D, found in animal sources such as fish, fish oils and egg, got a thumbs up from a Finnish study linking high blood levels of vitamin D to lower risk of Parkinson's, while British researchers found low vitamin D levels raised the risk of dementia.

Dutch researchers linked Vitamin E to a lower risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. You get Vitamin E from vegetable oils, nuts and green leafy vegetables.

Period of brain boom
Alcohol and dehydration shrink the brain. You knew that, right? But did you know hormonal changes do the reverse to a woman's brain? The size of a woman's brain changes throughout the menstrual cycle, with some areas growing by 2 per cent in the run-up to ovulation. The highest increases are in the areas involved in spatial location and facial recognition, abilities which may help them locate a suitable mating partner.

For aggression in kids
Children become three times more violent than usual between the ages of 10 and 15, shows data from 6,000 kids in the US. Violent behaviour was measured by how often children attacked with the idea of hurting a person so badly that they need medical treatment. Passive and social aggression was also factored. Encouraging adolescents to participate in "sports, music, theatre etc" can curb such tendencies.

Vitamin a day doesn't keep poor marks at bay
A multivitamin a day does not help students ace exams or even make it to school on time, suggests a new study of elementary school children. After tracking 700 third-through sixth-grade students over one school year, US researchers found no improvements in test scores, grade point averages, late arrivals or absenteeism. Supplementation only helps children who suffer from micronutrient deficiencies, reports the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.