Include salmon, walnuts in your daily diet to cut heart disease risk

  • PTI, Boston
  • Updated: Jun 29, 2016 16:42 IST
Walnuts, salmon and trouts are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. (Shutterstock)

Eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids such as salmon, trout, walnuts and flaxseed oil may significantly cut the incidence of developing a heart disease, finds a new global study.

By pooling findings from diverse large studies that had measured blood or tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids, researchers evaluated relationships with heart disease events over time.

They found that blood levels of seafood and plant-basedomega-3 fatty acids are moderately associated with a lower risk of dying from heart attacks.

Read: Your children too aggressive? Give them diet rich in Omega-3 fatty acids

“These new results, including many studies which previously had not reported their findings, provide the most comprehensive picture to-date of how omega-3s may influence heart disease,” said Liana C Del Gobbo from Stanford University in the US.

“At a time when some but not other trials of fish oil supplementation have shown benefits, there is uncertainty about cardiovascular effects of omega-3s,” said Dariush Mozaffarian from Tufts University in the US. “Our results lend support to the importance of fish and omega-3 consumption as part of a healthy diet,” he added.

Fish is the major food source of omega-3 fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), researchers said.

Fatty fish contain the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. (Shutterstock)

Fatty fish such as salmon, trout, anchovies, sardines, and herring contain the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, although all fish contain some levels.

In addition to omega-3 fatty acids, fish provide specific proteins, vitamin D, selenium, and other minerals and elements, researchers said.

Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid found in walnuts, flaxseed oil, and canola oil and some other seed and nuts and their oils, they said.

Read: Having fish oil when pregnant doesn’t cut your kid’s obesity risk: Study

A total of 19 studies were involved from 16 countries and including 45,637 participants. Of these, 7,973 people developed a first heart attack over time, including 2,781 deaths and 7,157 nonfatal heart attacks.

Overall, both plant-based and seafood-based omega-3s were associated with about a 10% lower risk of fatal heart attacks, researchers said.

In contrast, these fatty acids biomarkers were generally not associated with a risk of nonfatal heart attacks, suggesting a more specific mechanism for benefits of omega-3s related to death, they said.

The findings were published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Follow @htlifeandstyle for more.

also read

Say no to firecrackers: Make this Diwali a pet-friendly festival of lights
Show comments