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One hour to 15 years: What not smoking means for your health and wallet

Have you thought about all the money you will save after you quit smoking- cigarettes cost money and the cost is increasing all the time, right? We tell you exactly that.

health and fitness Updated: May 31, 2016 19:09 IST
World No Tobacco Day

Have you thought about all the money you will save after you quit smoking- Cigarettes cost money and the cost is increasing all the time, right? We tell you exactly that. (Shutterstock)

You probably already know that quitting smoking is good for your health. It’s obvious.

But have you thought about all the money you will save after you quit — cigarettes cost money and the cost is increasing all the time, right?

Read: Smokers beware! Delhi police to crack down on smoking in public spaces

So, when you quit smoking and find you have some extra money in your pocket, you don’t have to use it merely to pad out your monthly budget, or let it slip away with a few thoughtless purchases.

Think bigger goals.

You can use this cash to start something new: That might be a timely financial investment, or an investment in yourself to start a new career or kick-start a passion project. You could begin a fitness program, spruce up your home, or update your tech set-up. Or just recharge with a memorable weekend getaway.

Read: Why you should think twice before smoking an e-cigarette

This World No Tobacco Day, WNTD (May 31), we tell you exactly what not smoking for an hour, a day, a week, a month, six months, a year, five years, 10 and 15 years can mean for your health and your wallet. Because, you can’t not love money or yourself.

1 hour after quitting

* How your health improves: Your heart rate and blood pressure drop. (Effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and pulse pressure amplification, Mahmud A, Feely J. Hypertension. 2003:41:183)

1 day after quitting

* How your health improves: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202)

1 month after quitting

* How your health improves: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp.193, 194,196, 285, 323)

6 months after quitting

* How your health improves: Coughing and shortness of breath decrease; cilia (tiny hair-like structures that move mucus out of the lungs) start to regain normal function in the lungs, increasing the ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce the risk of infection. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304)

1 year after quitting

* How your health improves: The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker’s. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010, p. 359)

5 years after quitting

* How your health improves: Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder are cut in half. Cervical cancer risk falls to that of a non-smoker. Stroke risk can fall to that of a non-smoker after 2-5 years. (A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease - The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007, p 341)

10 years after quitting

* How your health improves: The risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a person who is still smoking. The risk of cancer of the larynx (voice box) and pancreas decreases.

(A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease - The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 155, 165)

15 years after quitting

* How your health improves: The risk of coronary heart disease is that of a non-smoker’s. (Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007. p 11)

These are just a few of the benefits of quitting smoking for good. Quitting smoking lowers the risk of diabetes, lets blood vessels work better, and helps the heart and lungs. Quitting while you are younger will reduce your health risks more, but quitting at any age can give back years of life that would be lost by continuing to smoke. (American Cancer Soc)