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Smile to look younger

The simple act of smiling takes years off your age, say German researchers. Not just the temporary wrinkles created by smiling make it more difficult to judge a person’s age, people who look happy are perceived attractive in others ways as well, including being younger than they are.

health and fitness Updated: Nov 12, 2011 23:02 IST

Smile to look younger

The simple act of smiling takes years off your age, say German researchers. Not just the temporary wrinkles created by smiling make it more difficult to judge a person’s age, people who look happy are perceived attractive in others ways as well, including being younger than they are.

Women benefit more, with smiling knocking off three years from their age, the journal Psychology and Aging reports.


Exercise, music sharpen brain

If you listen to music while exercising, your brain works better too, showed a study of mental performance after exercising without music, and exercising with music. On average, people performed more than twice as well on a verbal fluency test after listening to music while exercising than they did after exercising without the music. There was no change in mental alertness in people who didn’t listen to music.

To comprehend rhythm, the brain has to sort out tone, timing and sequencing.. This complex endeavour fires up the brain’s frontal lobe, which is associated with mental agility associated with abstract thinking and forward planning.


Cooking ups food energy

Contrary to popular belief, cooked food gives you much more energy than raw. Cooking was key in helping early humans become bigger, stronger and more advanced, said scientists at Harvard University. Cooking denatures meat — causes the structure of the protein to unwind — to make its digestion and absorption in the digestive tract easier. Meat has been part of the human diet for 2.5 million years, but the biological changes that kicked in 1.9 million years ago coincide with early humans using fire for cooking, they said.