Sorry girls! Female 'Viagra' will take years to reach India | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
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Sorry girls! Female 'Viagra' will take years to reach India

Research on long-term effects of the drug Addyi and social unacceptance will delay the entry of the drug, that treats low libido conditions in women and termed the female 'Viagra', into Indian markets.

health and fitness Updated: Aug 21, 2015 16:48 IST
Research on long-term effects of the drug Addyi and social unacceptance will delay the entry of the drug into Indian markets. (Shutterstock Photo)
Research on long-term effects of the drug Addyi and social unacceptance will delay the entry of the drug into Indian markets. (Shutterstock Photo)

While women in the United States rejoice the approval of Addyi, the female 'Viagra', there's no reason for women back home to cheer as the drug may take at least three to four years to be introduced in the Indian market as trials are still on to ascertain its long-term effects, say doctors.

To add to their woes, the existing social unacceptance will further delay the use of the drug, which increases libido in females as has been claimed, say doctors.

"It will take three to four years for the female viagra to come to India as the clearance by the Drugs Controller General of India is a must," JB Sharma, a professor of gynaecology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, tells IANS.

"Also there exists a lot of social unacceptance in the Indian society, which needs to be overcome before making the medicine a success," Sharma says.

He says approximate 20-30% of the Indian female population suffer from problems related to lack of sexual desires.

Addyi is the first drug developed to address low libido conditions in women and to be approved by the US-Food and Drugs Administration (FDA).

Read: Listen ladies, female ‘Viagra’ alone won’t help you

Under a US FDA-imposed safety plan, doctors will only be able to prescribe Addyi after completing an online certification process that requires counselling patients about the medicine's risks.

Pharmacists will also need certification and will be required to remind patients not to drink alcohol while taking the drug.

Nupur Gupta, a consultant gynaecologist at Gurgaon-based Paras Hospital, says that as the drug is new and still under trial, the introduction of the medicine in Indian market will take time.

"Sales in India will be slow initially. Although Indian mindset is changing as per world's advancements, we will take time as we still think that treatment is possible without medication," Gupta tells IANS.