Add more drugs to the generic list, say AIIMS docs | health | Hindustan Times
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Add more drugs to the generic list, say AIIMS docs

Doctors at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Delhi, want more medicines to be added to the list of generic medicines

health Updated: Apr 25, 2017 20:12 IST
generic medicines

Shortage of generic medicines is a huge problem(Shutterstock)

Junior doctors from All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) have written to the director, asking him to add 53 commonly used drugs to the hospital’s list of generic drugs.

The move came after the Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that the government will bring in a law to compel doctors to prescribe generic medicines only.

The Medical Council of India (MCI), also reiterated its guidelines of prescribing drugs by their generic names.

“We are not against prescribing generic medicines. But, the government has to ensure availability and the quality of these drugs. Such a law should be brought in only after proper homework,” said Dr Vijay Gurjar, president of the resident doctors’ association at AIIMS.

The hospital’s list of generic medicines currently has 230 medicines listed. The listed generic drugs are available free at the hospital pharmacy.

In comparison, Delhi government lists around 1,400 essential drugs that can be availed free at its hospital pharmacies.

According to the doctors, only one-sixth of the patients receiving treatment at the hospital avail the free medicines.

“Even the medicines that have been listed mostly run-out and the people have to stand in long queues to get them. This discourages people from getting free medicines,” said Dr Gurjar.

In their letter, the doctors have written, “We are wondering if you can open a few more outlets of free generic medicines in AIIMS so that people don’t hesitate in availing these services due to over-crowding.”

The doctors also raised concerns about the quality of the generic drugs and the unavailability of the combination drugs.

“Ensuring quality of these medicines is a major issue... (Also) most of the medicines available are not in combination, which is the need of the hour to decrease the number of pills for patients,” the letter said.

The doctors had written a letter to the administration in 2015 to get the 53 drugs added to the list. “However, no action has been taken in the two years,” said Dr Gurjar.