Anti-obesity product extracted from seaweeds to hit the market soon | health | Hindustan Times
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Anti-obesity product extracted from seaweeds to hit the market soon

Researchers have proved Seaweed has anti-obesity properties

health Updated: May 24, 2017 19:06 IST
Seaweed is the new superfood
Seaweed is the new superfood(Istock)

The Central Marine Research Institute (CMFRI) in Kochi, Kerala, is planning to start commercial production of its recently developed nutraceutical product aimed at reducing bad cholesterol and obesity.

The premier marine research body said it developed the product from selected seaweeds after years of intense research. After clinical test it was found to be effective in combating abnormal amount of lipids in the blood like bad cholesterol and triglycerides. CMFRI entered into a commercial production agreement with a private company on Wednesday.

Called CadalminTM Ace, the bioactive principles contained in the drug inhibit enzymes like hydroxymethyl glutaryl and many target receptors that are primarily responsible for causing obesity and dyslipidemia (high amount of blood fats such as cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood).

“Pre-clinical trials show the product has no side effects even after patients has had tablets over a long time. It is prepared from seaweeds that are known for their extraordinary medicinal properties and are commonly available in coastal waters”, said CMFRI director Dr A Gopalakrishnan. CMFRI is planning to tap marine weeds, found in abundance in Indian coastal waters, in a big way to develop more health products.

“Seaweeds are one of the predominant oceanic flora and these marine herbs are considered as a prolific source of bioactive compounds as they are able to produce a great variety of secondary metabolites characterized by a broad spectrum of extraordinary medicinal properties,” said Dr Kajal Chakraborty, senior scientist at the CMFRI adding seaweeds have long been part of the traditional diet of coastal communities.

The understanding of health benefits of seaweeds have been steadily increasing over the last three decades. “These substances exhibit an appreciable number of distinct biological activities, such as anti-tumoral, anti-viral, antifungal, and anti-proliferative actions,” he said. The CMFRI has been doing intense research on seaweeds since 2005.

The CMFRI and Indian Council of Agricultural Research are also in the process of standardising and promoting seaweed farming along Indian coasts as a livelihood option for coastal communities. This is expected to compensate for the dip in income for fishing community during lean seasons, Dr Gopalakrishnan said.