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50 years of Bond’s legacy

His last documenatry Fire in Babylon was a love letter to the West Indies cricket team. But, his next docu, Everything or Nothing: The Untold Story of 007, about the debonair British spy James Bond, is an “another level” altogether, says British director Stevan Riley.

hollywood Updated: Oct 19, 2012 01:19 IST
Robin Bansal

His last documenatry Fire in Babylon was a love letter to the West Indies cricket team. But, his next docu, Everything or Nothing: The Untold Story of 007, about the debonair British spy James Bond, is an “another level” altogether, says British director Stevan Riley.

“I’m trying to tell the Bible story of Bond. Everyone thinks that James Bond has been forever and will be forever, but, that’s not the case. It’s a miracle of cinematic history that Bond survived so long and managed to adapt and be successful,” Riley told us during his recent visit to country.

“It faced a lot of challenges and the same were faced by the author Ian Fleming (above left),” added Riley, who also shows “aspects of Skyfall” in the docu.

“The real romance for me was to show the journey of Fleming’s first book, Casino Royale and coming back to it with Daniel Craig,” he said.

Daniel Craig

Released to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Bond on film on October 5, the unvarnished story behind the making of the longest running film franchise will be unveiled in India at the 14th Mumbai Film Festival today.

Meanwhile, one can’t resist asking him about his highly praised film, Fire in Babylon, that highlights the struggle in the West Indies and how cricket acted as a unification factor in bringing the Caribbean islands, together under the banner of a world class cricketing unit in the 1970s and 1980s.

“It was basically also a history of the West Indies people as it was about this tale of this generation of cricket players,” said Riley

“As a young kid, I was just enthralled by the danger of this side. The batsmen would be running for their lives. I never viewed cricket as an athletic, risky sort of game until that time. It changed my view,” he added.