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Another 3D joyride from Cameron's stable

Hollywood filmmaker James Cameron left the world slack-jawed in 2010, with Avatar, the film that started the 3D revolution. Now, he is back with yet another gripping tale - Sanctum - a story about an underground rescue mission.

hollywood Updated: Feb 02, 2011 01:38 IST
Neha Sharma

After Titanic, no one thought he could do better. But Hollywood filmmaker James Cameron left the world slack-jawed in 2010, with Avatar, the film that started the 3D revolution. Now, he is back with yet another gripping tale - Sanctum - a story about an underground rescue mission.



Talking about the film, which releases this Friday, he says, "The idea for Sanctum was based on an expedition Andrew Wright (the writer of the film) explored and dove into a remote cave system hidden beneath the Nullarbor Plain in Australia. During the trip, a freak storm caused the cave entrance to collapse, leaving 15 people trapped deep underground. A rescue mission was mounted and, incredibly, everyone survived the harrowing ordeal. When I heard his script, I absolutely loved it."



The film was shot in Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia and stars Ioan Gruffudd and Richard Roxburgh. Avatar in 3D may have been criticised but the filmmaker who has used the technique extensively in Sanctum feels that it is the future of cinema. "There have been a lot of James Cameronnaysayers.



They love to say, ‘Conversion has hurt it. It’s just a flash in the pan. The market is retreating.’ That’s all bull. There were some dips, but they were dips in the growth curve. It’s never stopped growing. I’m excited about the possibilities of new technology, like higher frame rates in the theatres, better camera systems and higher resolution cameras, but I’m also concerned about the possibilities of bad 3D being done. People get into it who don’t know what they’re doing and they’re under the gun financially, and maybe they go with the wrong camera gear, or listen to wrong advice, or think, ‘We won’t pay those high-priced experts. We’ll just figure out how to do it ourselves.’

So, there’s the possibility of seeing some bad movies come to market. And, I think that these fast conversions that are done during post-production are still a problem.”

How did he react to the criticism of Avatar in 3D? “Avatar had so many broad vistas that the difference between watching the movie in 2D and 3D was not that great because the more expansive the image, the less you feel in close contact with objects and characters. The difference between experiencing Sanctum in 2D and 3D is much greater because the 3D will constantly inform you, with the sense of claustrophobia. We knew that the claustrophobia of the film and the medium in which we were working would work together really well to constantly give the audience that feeling. I think 3D and this type of film go perfectly well together.”