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The man behind Watchmen

Hollywood director Zack Snyder’s latest film, Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga’Hoole, which released on Friday, is another addition to his kitty of movies adapted from comic books, graphic novels and works of fantasy and fiction.

hollywood Updated: Nov 02, 2010 02:26 IST

Hollywood director Zack Snyder’s latest film,

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga’Hoole

, which released on Friday, is another addition to his kitty of movies adapted from comic books, graphic novels and works of fantasy and fiction.



In 2004, this screenwriter-producer made his directorial debut with a remake of

Dawn Of The Dead

. Then he adapted Frank Miller’s comic series,

300

, followed by

Watchmen

.



Family viewing


The only difference is that

Legend Of The Guardians

is not an ‘R’ rated film, like all his others. Says Snyder, “I wanted to make something that my kids could watch. Also, when I saw the primary animation, I was stunned. The studio said ‘don’t worry, this is a family film and you wouldn’t be interested’. And I said, ‘I am interested’!”



Snyder’s next project,

Sucker Punch

, promos of which have been doing the rounds of YouTube for a while now, will be a first for him — it is an original script. “Working on an original script is easier,” says Snyder. “With

Sucker Punch

, I felt like someone took the handcuffs off me.”



Super plans


The director, who has been known for his slow motion action sequences, has reportedly been approached by Warner Bros to direct the next

Superman

film. Apart from that, he is currently working on a sequel to

300

, called

Xerxes

. “This story takes place parallel to

300

. Frank (Miller) is writing the graphic novel. He sends me the pages when he finishes them and I try and work it into a script.”



His 2009 film

Watchmen

attempted to take on the cult status of the original graphic novel. But, in the film, he changed the ending from the book to fit the film to the designated length. He explains, “For a long time, we talked about just having the monster take the blame for the catastrophe (according to original ending). Then we realised the film would need to be 30–40 minutes longer. David Hayter, who also wrote the adaptation, then came up with the idea of framing Dr Manhattan for the disaster. The idea of framing God for our own problems was kind of elegant and I liked it.”



Snyder, also an ad-film director, has visited India for various shoots, but is not an expert on Bollywood. “I have seen a few Indian movies,” he signs off.