7 things about Isro’s launch of its weather satellite | india-news | Hindustan Times
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7 things about Isro’s launch of its weather satellite

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) is all set to launch its 2,211kg advanced weather satellite INSAT-3DR on board the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-F05) from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota at 4.10pm on Thursday.

india Updated: Sep 08, 2016 14:50 IST
Hemanth CS
People look at PSLV C-34 rocket as it propels into sky after being launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota.
People look at PSLV C-34 rocket as it propels into sky after being launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota.(PTI Photo)

The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) is all set to launch its 2,211kg advanced weather satellite INSAT-3DR on board the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-F05) from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota at 4.10pm on Thursday.

1) Thursday’s launch is not just another launch for the Isro, but a significant one as it is the first operational flight of the GLSV with the indigenously made Cryogenic Upper Stage technology. Earlier, this advanced system that produces more thrust for the launcher was procured from Russia.

2) The Isro has launched the GLSV with the India Cryogenic Upper Stage on-board four times earlier. But Thursday’s launch will be the first operational flight of the launcher. The previous launches were just test flights.

3) The operational launch means the sole aim of the mission is to launch the satellite onboard and there would be not testing or experiments involved during the mission (to test components/parameters of the launch vehicle).

4) GSLV missions of the past (GSLV-D5 and D-6), launched in January 2014 and August 2015 respectively, were test flights. But Thursday’s launch is a graduation from test to operational phase.

5) Another significant aspect of this mission is that it would put India in an elite group of nations that can launch heavy satellites (GSLV is designed to inject 2 to 2.5 tonne class of satellites). Besides, it also clears the deck for launching the ambitious Moon Mission Chandrayaan 2, which is due next year.

6) India has successfully built the GSLV launches after a 20-odd year old struggle. The cryogenic engine technology was denied to India due to restrictions by the US. However, the Isro has mastered it after a two decade long struggle.

7) The GSLV-F05 will launch the INSAT-3DR, an advanced weather satellite. INSAT-3DR is an advanced meteorological satellite of India.