After ‘torture’ of married life, Rajkot man celebrates divorce by distributing kaju barfi | india-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 27, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

After ‘torture’ of married life, Rajkot man celebrates divorce by distributing kaju barfi

The kaju barfi box also has an attached note on how women protection laws have been “exploited”.

india Updated: Apr 24, 2017 13:55 IST
Hiral Dave
Rinkesh Rachchh distributed sweets after his divorce was finalised.
Rinkesh Rachchh distributed sweets after his divorce was finalised. (Picture on request)

For most people, going through a divorce is a sobering time that often comes with great distress for the family.

But no such woes for Rajkot resident Rinkesh Rachchh, who is being showered with congratulatory messages from friends, family and even scores of strangers after distributing customised boxes of sweets to celebrate the “sweet reward” of divorce.

The 26-year-old businessman says he has sent out at least 50kg of Kaju Barfi in boxes that read “Chutacheda Harakh Na” (to celebrate divorce). The obverse side of the box carries names of his family members, including parents and a younger brother.

“Divorce is nothing less than a sweet reward after torture of one year of married life and a legal struggle of two more years. It definitely calls for celebration,” Rinkesh told HT. The box also has an attached note on how women protection laws have been “exploited”.

The kaju barfi box distributed by Rinkesh to celebrate his divorce. (Picture on request)

His divorce was finalised on April 15 after two years of wrangling, and says his phone has been ringing off the hook since then. Hundreds of acquaintances and even strangers have been calling on his number printed on the box, some even to seek advice after seeing photos on social media.

“Many men called just to tell me that they understand my happiness. Some wanted to know how I handled legal tangles that favour women and a large number of mothers called just to vent out their ‘horrible’ experiences with daughters-in-law.”

Rinkesh, however, has protected the identity of his former wife and refrained from getting into details of the bitter divorce procedure.

“It all started with demand of living separately from my family. I realised about women favouring laws only after I initiated divorce procedure,” he says, adding, “It took me two years (to get divorce) as the settlement amount sought by her initially was beyond my means. Even the best lawyers were of no help.”

Rinkesh ( left), along with family, hands a box of sweets to a relative. (Picture on request)

Rinkesh, who runs a ginning mill, sees this as a new beginning. “I value time a lot so I decided to move on.” He says he is looking forward to marrying again and, that too, with all pomp and celebration.