Amar Singh rises amid Samajwadi Party crisis at the cost of Ram Gopal Yadav | india-news | Hindustan Times
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Amar Singh rises amid Samajwadi Party crisis at the cost of Ram Gopal Yadav

Five months after his return to the Samajwadi Party that expelled him in early 2010, Amar Singh has emerged stronger in a current turmoil in its top brass by simultaneously settling old scores within the fold

YadavFamilyFeud Updated: Oct 25, 2016 12:07 IST
Rajya Sabha MP Amar Singh during the Monsoon session in New Delhi in July 2016.
Rajya Sabha MP Amar Singh during the Monsoon session in New Delhi in July 2016. (Sonu Mehta/HT File )

Five months after his return to the Samajwadi Party that expelled him in early 2010, Amar Singh has emerged stronger in a current turmoil in its top brass by simultaneously settling old scores within the fold.

SP supremo Mulayam Singh Yadav now calls the 60-year-old returnee a “brother”, much to the setback of leader Ram Gopal Yadav — a once-trusted lieutenant of the party patriarch.

The turn of events in the feud-riddled SP during last 24 hours shows a rising clout of Singh, who is likely to emerge as the party’s face in the national capital. This can strongly work against Mulayam’s cousin Ram Gopal, who is the other prominent SP face in Lutyens’ Delhi amid the accusation of his hobnobbing with the rival BJP that rules the Centre.

Singh is with Mulayam’s brother Shivpal Yadav, who is the SP’s state chief. Together, they are fighting a common rival: chief minister Akhilesh Yadav, whom they accuse of sidelining them.

In 2010, when Singh was removed from party posts, the move was at the behest of Akhilesh, the son of Mulayam.

For Singh, it is now time to hit back at Akhilesh, 17 years younger to him. One target in the mission is Ram Gopal, who was instrumental in propelling Akhilesh to the CM’s post and — in the process — turning into the party’s chief strategist.

Read | Friends over family: Why Amar Singh scores better than son Akhilesh for Mulayam

Today, Singh, who has stayed away from meetings of senior SP leaders, has managed to stay afloat amid the war in the Yadav family. On Monday, Mulayam threw his weight behind Singh, calling him a “brother” who helped him during troubled times.

Mulayam’s support to Singh came a day after SP workers stomped on the 76-year-old’s picture and burnt his effigy in some districts, including Lucknow and Agra, blaming the veteran for all the troubles in the party.

Often, Mulayam used to recall “only two persons stayed glued to me during my times of crisis”. One, he would say, is late socialist MP Janeshwar Mishra and the other is Amar.

Singh joined the SP two decades ago when the 1992-founded party was trying to create an identity for itself on the national level. The SP was also, reportedly, starved of funds. Singh, who was known for his acumen as a negotiator and mediator in the corridors of power and business at the national level, came in handy for the party.

Till then, the SP was a regional party and Mulayam a master-politician in his native Uttar Pradesh. Singh’s 1996 entry into the SP broadened the party’s political canvas and the stature of its founder. Soon, on June 1 that year, Mulayam became the defence minister in the United Front government.

Singh was later instrumental in mediation between his party and the Congress — and played a key role in the SP’s support to the two successive UPA governments from 2004.

Then, in 2010, Singh had to exit the SP. That paved the way for the entry of Ram Gopal as the party’s chief strategist in Delhi.

That had not been very fruitful for the party, many believe, saying that the SP has been isolated at the national level. Political observers cite this as a probable reason for Mulayam not currently backing his cousin.

For more on the Yadav family feud, click here.