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HindustanTimes Wed,01 Oct 2014

Parents write to DoE, seek changes in nursery criteria

Mallica Joshi, Hindustan Times  New Delhi, August 13, 2014
First Published: 23:54 IST(13/8/2014) | Last Updated: 23:56 IST(13/8/2014)

After schools, it was the parents’ turn to write to the Directorate of Education (DoE) with suggestions on the nursery admission guidelines for the next session.

According to the proposed admission criteria, distance should be among the most important criteria but in a staggered way.    

“Preference should be given to a child who stays near the school. There can be different points for different categories such as 0-3 kilometres, 3-6 kilometres, 6-9 kilometres and so on. Points can decrease as distance increases,” the letter sent to the DoE states.

The letter also suggests that points should be given to children of parents who stay in areas where there aren’t any good schools and if they agree to pick and drop their child to school.

According to Sumit Vohra, founder of admissionsnursery.com, the suggestions have been collected from members over three months.

The parent community has come out against points for children of alumni as they feel it is an unfair advantage. “There should be no points or quota for alumni, otherwise all first-borns will be left out,” the letter states.

The issue is a controversial one as critics argue that alumni points make it easier for influential people to get their children admitted in the same school. Others argue that if high alumni points are accorded, only children with an older siblings or alumni parents can make it to the list.    

The parents’ body has also suggested that if points for alumni are being given, equal points should be given to the first child as well and those using alumni points should not be given this advantage. 

Instead of extra points for girls, the body states that there could be a 5% quota. It also suggests that seats be reserved for differently abled children.

“We are aware that no criteria can satisfy all parents. The problem is clearly of supply and demand. Unless the number of seats and schools is increased and government schools are upgraded, these problems will persist,” said Vohra.


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