Now, take selfies with Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol at Allahabad museum | india-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 23, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Now, take selfies with Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol at Allahabad museum

Visitors at the Allahabad Museum can now take a selfie with freedom fighter Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol that he used to kill himself to avoid being captured alive by the British.

india Updated: Aug 09, 2016 12:10 IST
Rajesh Srivastava
Visitors at the Allahabad Museum can now take a selfie with freedom fighter Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol.
Visitors at the Allahabad Museum can now take a selfie with freedom fighter Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol.(HT Photo)

Visitors at the Allahabad Museum can now take a selfie with freedom fighter Chandra Shekhar Azad’s pistol that he used to kill himself to avoid being captured alive by the British.

They can also shoot video with the prized possession of the museum by paying nominal charges.

The decision was taken by the museum authorities following instructions from the ministry of culture to promote cultural and other social activities in light of August Kranti Diwas and Independence Day celebrations.

The pistol displayed and preserved in the entrance hall of the museum is a Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless semi-auto.32 bore. Azad used it to shoot himself after a long firefight with British policemen at the Alfred Park, now known as the Chandrashekhar Azad Park, on 27 February 1931.

“The main purpose of taking the initiative is to make youngsters know about Azad’s struggle to free India from the clutches of the British government as well as his inspiring principles behind shooting himself with the pistol,” Rajesh Purohit, the museum’s director, said.

The charges for taking selfies with the pistol is Rs 50 and Rs 1000 for shooting videos.

Purohit said visitors can also take photos and videos of Gandhi Smriti Vahan, the vehicle that was used for carrying the ashes of Mahatma Gandhi to Sangam or the confluence of the Ganga and the Yamuna and the invisible Saraswati in 1948.

The 47 model V-8 Ford truck has been maintained in its original form and kept in a shed located beside the museum. A few years ago, a film ‘Road to Sangam’ starring Paresh Rawal was also produced.

The film was centred on the vehicle and its journey up to the Sangam.